November 12th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 52,304,064. Total deaths: 1,287,051. Total recoveries: 34,021,610.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases:10,415,779. Total deaths: 241,907. Total recoveries: 3,997,175.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 984,682. Total deaths: 18,070.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 328042 7216 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 71072 1096 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 65234 1514 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 15625 171 10.4 846,006
Riverside 72341
1352
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 328042 cases across LA County, including 7216 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 16 new deaths and 2091 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 14315

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 511 36,478
La Verne 624 32,206
Pomona 6753 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • Rural hospitals cannot afford ultra-cold freezers to store the leading COVID-19 vaccine, which has to be stored at -70 degrees Celsius. The CDC has advised state health departments against purchasing ultra-cold freezers – which cost $10,000 to $15,000 each – saying other vaccines with less demanding storage requirements will be available soon. The Pfizer company said it is committed to working closely with local government and ensuring everyone has the opportunity to have access to the vaccine. (STAT)
  • The drug maker Pfizer announced Monday that its coronavirus vaccine appears more than 90 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 among volunteers. No serious safety concerns have been observed. Pfizer plans to ask the Food and Drug Administration for emergency authorization of the two-dose vaccine later this month and manufacture enough doses to immunize 15 million to 20 million people by the end of this year. (New York Times)
    Congressional Democrats face a loss of leverage in negotiations over a new COVID-19 relief bill, as Senate Republicans appear set to hold the majority and push for a smaller aid package of $500 billion or less, without direct stimulus checks or large-scale aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Wednesday plans to reinvigorate stimulus talks in a bipartisan manner. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)

Latest research news

  • Analysis of mobile-phone data to track human contacts at highly clustered urban venues might effectively guide policy decisions about reopening and explain infection disparities. Integrating mobility data into epidemiological surveillance systems should become routine as we rebuild such surveillance systems to incorporate the lessons of this pandemic. (Kevin C. Ma and Marc Lipsitch Nature)
  • The FDA issued an emergency use authorization Monday for the Eli Lilly and Company monoclonal antibody therapy to treat mild to moderate coronavirus infections in adults and children. The single antibody treatment, called bamlanivimab, must be infused in a hospital or other health care setting. It is the first monoclonal antibody to be authorized for use in treating coronavirus. (CNN)
  • Scientists raise concerns that wide-ranging symptoms of COVID-19 disease are related to damaged lining of blood vessels, or endothelium. The virus attacks the endothelial cells directly, or endothelial cells sustain collateral damage along the way as the immune system reacts, and sometimes overreacts, to the invading virus. (NPR)
  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 11th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 51,684,237. Total deaths: 1,275,124. Total recoveries: 33,651,254.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases:10,272,929. Total deaths: 239,896. Total recoveries: 3,961,873.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 977,218. Total deaths: 18,001.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 325951 7200 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 70,347 1096 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 64891 1512 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 15568 171 10.4 846,006
Riverside 72341
1352
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 325951 cases across LA County, including 7200 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 23 new deaths and 2252 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 14267

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 505 36,478
La Verne 622 32,206
Pomona 6713 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • The drug maker Pfizer announced Monday that its coronavirus vaccine appears more than 90 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 among volunteers. No serious safety concerns have been observed. Pfizer plans to ask the Food and Drug Administration for emergency authorization of the two-dose vaccine later this month and manufacture enough doses to immunize 15 million to 20 million people by the end of this year. (New York Times)
  • Congressional Democrats face a loss of leverage in negotiations over a new COVID-19 relief bill, as Senate Republicans appear set to hold the majority and push for a smaller aid package of $500 billion or less, without direct stimulus checks or large-scale aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Wednesday plans to reinvigorate stimulus talks in a bipartisan manner. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.

Latest research news

  • The FDA issued an emergency use authorization Monday for the Eli Lilly and Company monoclonal antibody therapy to treat mild to moderate coronavirus infections in adults and children. The single antibody treatment, called bamlanivimab, must be infused in a hospital or other health care setting. It is the first monoclonal antibody to be authorized for use in treating coronavirus. (CNN)
  • Scientists raise concerns that wide-ranging symptoms of COVID-19 disease are related to damaged lining of blood vessels, or endothelium. The virus attacks the endothelial cells directly, or endothelial cells sustain collateral damage along the way as the immune system reacts, and sometimes overreacts, to the invading virus. (NPR)
  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 10th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 50,913,451. Total deaths: 1,263,089. Total recoveries: 33,289,404.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases:10,110,552. Total deaths: 238,251. Total recoveries: 3,928,845.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 971,851. Total deaths: 17,977.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 323699 7177 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 68865 1096 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 64621 1509 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 15504 171 10.4 846,006
Riverside 71620
1338
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 323699 cases across LA County, including 7172 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 5 new deaths and 1418 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 14111

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 492 36,478
La Verne 602 32,206
Pomona 6590 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • The drug maker Pfizer announced Monday that its coronavirus vaccine appears more than 90 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 among volunteers. No serious safety concerns have been observed. Pfizer plans to ask the Food and Drug Administration for emergency authorization of the two-dose vaccine later this month and manufacture enough doses to immunize 15 million to 20 million people by the end of this year. (New York Times)
  • Congressional Democrats face a loss of leverage in negotiations over a new COVID-19 relief bill, as Senate Republicans appear set to hold the majority and push for a smaller aid package of $500 billion or less, without direct stimulus checks or large-scale aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Wednesday plans to reinvigorate stimulus talks in a bipartisan manner. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.

Latest research news

  • The FDA issued an emergency use authorization Monday for the Eli Lilly and Company monoclonal antibody therapy to treat mild to moderate coronavirus infections in adults and children. The single antibody treatment, called bamlanivimab, must be infused in a hospital or other health care setting. It is the first monoclonal antibody to be authorized for use in treating coronavirus. (CNN)
  • Scientists raise concerns that wide-ranging symptoms of COVID-19 disease are related to damaged lining of blood vessels, or endothelium. The virus attacks the endothelial cells directly, or endothelial cells sustain collateral damage along the way as the immune system reacts, and sometimes overreacts, to the invading virus. (NPR)
  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 9th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 50,550,062. Total deaths: 1,258,321. Total recoveries: 33,099,495.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 9,982,054. Total deaths: 237,608. Total recoveries: 3,881,491.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 964,639. Total deaths: 17,963.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 322281 7172 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 68721 1096 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 64311 1509 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 15353 169 10.4 846,006
Riverside 70975
1333
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 322281 cases across LA County, including 7172 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 2 new deaths and 2,233 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 14092

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 491 36,478
La Verne 601 32,206
Pomona 6573 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • Congressional Democrats face a loss of leverage in negotiations over a new COVID-19 relief bill, as Senate Republicans appear set to hold the majority and push for a smaller aid package of $500 billion or less, without direct stimulus checks or large-scale aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Wednesday plans to reinvigorate stimulus talks in a bipartisan manner. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)

Latest research news

  • Scientists raise concerns that wide-ranging symptoms of COVID-19 disease are related to damaged lining of blood vessels, or endothelium. The virus attacks the endothelial cells directly, or endothelial cells sustain collateral damage along the way as the immune system reacts, and sometimes overreacts, to the invading virus. (NPR)
  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 4th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 48,885,919. Total deaths: 1,236,707. Total recoveries: 32,309,610.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 9,623,471. Total deaths: 235,056. Total recoveries: 3,781,751.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 944,576. Total deaths: 17,815.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 315634 7140 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 67196 1092 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 63125 1494 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14936 169 10.4 846,006
Riverside 70309
1331
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 315634 cases across LA County, including 7140 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 23 new deaths and 2,108 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13954

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 484 36,478
La Verne 588 32,206
Pomona 6455 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • Congressional Democrats face a loss of leverage in negotiations over a new COVID-19 relief bill, as Senate Republicans appear set to hold the majority and push for a smaller aid package of $500 billion or less, without direct stimulus checks or large-scale aid to state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Wednesday plans to reinvigorate stimulus talks in a bipartisan manner. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)

Latest research news

  • Scientists raise concerns that wide-ranging symptoms of COVID-19 disease are related to damaged lining of blood vessels, or endothelium. The virus attacks the endothelial cells directly, or endothelial cells sustain collateral damage along the way as the immune system reacts, and sometimes overreacts, to the invading virus. (NPR)
  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 3rd, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 47,331,327. Total deaths: 1,208,654. Total recoveries: 31,434,282.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 9,300,314. Total deaths: 231,011. Total recoveries: 3,674,981.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 930,628. Total deaths: 17,672.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 310595 7076 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 65331 1079 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 62264 1484 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14686 167 10.4 846,006
Riverside 68920
1322
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 310595 cases across LA County, including 7076 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 2 new deaths and 1,405 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13830

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 474 36,478
La Verne 575 32,206
Pomona 6354 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • Newsom overstepped his authority in June when he required vote-by-mail ballots be sent to the state’s 21 million registered voters. A Sutter County Superior Court judge also issued an injunction barring the governor from taking executive action that “changes existing statutory law or makes new statutory law or legislative policy,” rebuking a governor who has relied heavily on executive orders to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)
  • Medical experts from Mayo Clinic propose establishing a centralized national coalition to coordinate hypothesis-driven clinical research trials for treatment and prevention of COVID-19. The proposal calls for a uniform standard of care to enable easier comparison among treatments at every trial stage. (Gianrico Farrugia, Tom Mihaljevic, and Andrew D. Badley STAT)

Latest research news

  • The artificial-intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by MIT has correctly – with 98.5 percent success rate – identified people with COVID-19 only by the sound of their coughs. The researchers would need regulatory approval to develop it into an app. (BBC News)
  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)
  • Analysis of COVID-19 antibody tests on more than 365,000 people in England between June 20 and September 28 shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus antibodies dropped by 26.5 percent. across the study period, from almost 6 to 4.4 percent. The findings suggest that there may be a decline in the level of immunity in the population in the months following the first wave of the epidemic. (Imperial College London)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

November 2nd, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 46,643,798. Total deaths: 1,202,081. Total recoveries: 31,156,914.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 9,213,002. Total deaths: 231,011. Total recoveries: 3,630,579.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 926,534. Total deaths: 17,667.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 309190 7074 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 65207 1078 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 62080 1484 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14635 166 10.4 846,006
Riverside 68178
1319
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 309190 cases across LA County, including 7074 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 3 new deaths and 1,572 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13798

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 474 36,478
La Verne 574 32,206
Pomona 6323 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is expected to adopt a Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures to mitigate onboard COVID-19 transmission. The manual will offer technical guidance for the use of reliable tests when screening passengers ahead of flights, and its implementation by countries will be voluntary, without the obligation to remove quarantines. (Asia Times Financial)
  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)
  • Medical experts from Mayo Clinic propose establishing a centralized national coalition to coordinate hypothesis-driven clinical research trials for treatment and prevention of COVID-19. The proposal calls for a uniform standard of care to enable easier comparison among treatments at every trial stage. (Gianrico Farrugia, Tom Mihaljevic, and Andrew D. Badley STAT)
  • Europe reported more than 1.3 million new cases this past week, its highest single week count yet. With concerns the situation in Europe might soon spin out of control, governments are imposing curfews and social restrictions to avoid full-scale lockdowns that could hurt the economy and dim the upcoming holiday season. (NPR)

Latest research news

  • A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. At least one mutation allows the virus’s spike to evade a neutralizing antibody that humans naturally produce to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. The good news is that this mutation is rare and does not appear to make the disease more severe for infected patients. (The University of Texas at Austin News)
  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)
  • Analysis of COVID-19 antibody tests on more than 365,000 people in England between June 20 and September 28 shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus antibodies dropped by 26.5 percent. across the study period, from almost 6 to 4.4 percent. The findings suggest that there may be a decline in the level of immunity in the population in the months following the first wave of the epidemic. (Imperial College London)
  • Findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial show that an immunosuppressive drug tocilizumab is not an effective treatment strategy. The drug has been thought to disrupt the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19 in moderately ill patients. According to the study, tocilizumab has no significant effect on the risk of intubation or death, on disease worsening, or on time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen. (John H. Stone et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 30th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 45,179,529. Total deaths: 1,183,213. Total recoveries: 30,370,305.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,950,742. Total deaths: 228,696. Total recoveries: 3,554,336.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 916,918. Total deaths: 17,571.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 305070 7044 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 64131 1073 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 61358 1468 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14409 166 10.4 846,006
Riverside 67552
1306
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 305070 cases across LA County, including 7040 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 4 new deaths and 1,701 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13693

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 462 36,478
La Verne 558 32,206
Pomona 6246 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1696 77,000

Policy

  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)
  • Medical experts from Mayo Clinic propose establishing a centralized national coalition to coordinate hypothesis-driven clinical research trials for treatment and prevention of COVID-19. The proposal calls for a uniform standard of care to enable easier comparison among treatments at every trial stage. (Gianrico Farrugia, Tom Mihaljevic, and Andrew D. Badley STAT)
  • Europe reported more than 1.3 million new cases this past week, its highest single week count yet. With concerns the situation in Europe might soon spin out of control, governments are imposing curfews and social restrictions to avoid full-scale lockdowns that could hurt the economy and dim the upcoming holiday season. (NPR)
  • The Rockefeller Foundation will allocate $1 billion over the next three years to address the pandemic and its aftermath. It is the largest commitment in its 107-year history, and will primarily focus on expanding access to COVID-19 tests and vaccines, as well as investing in distributed green power sources for the more than 800 million people stuck in energy poverty. (Axios)

Latest research news

  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)
  • Analysis of COVID-19 antibody tests on more than 365,000 people in England between June 20 and September 28 shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus antibodies dropped by 26.5 percent. across the study period, from almost 6 to 4.4 percent. The findings suggest that there may be a decline in the level of immunity in the population in the months following the first wave of the epidemic. (Imperial College London)
  • Findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial show that an immunosuppressive drug tocilizumab is not an effective treatment strategy. The drug has been thought to disrupt the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19 in moderately ill patients. According to the study, tocilizumab has no significant effect on the risk of intubation or death, on disease worsening, or on time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen. (John H. Stone et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • A study to be published next week in the Journal of Hospital Medicine analyzed 5,263 COVID-19 patient records treated at NYU Langone hospitals in New York City and Long Island between March 1 and August 8. Using a range of risk factors for the disease, as well as indicators of the severity of the illness upon hospitalization, the study shows the likelihood of death from COVID-19 was on average 22 percentage points lower in August than in March for most critically ill patients. (NYU Langone Health and NYU School of Medicine)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 28th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 44,644,423. Total deaths: 1,176,328. Total recoveries: 30,117,680.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,873,861. Total deaths: 227,897. Total recoveries: 3,518,140.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 908,713. Total deaths: 17,475.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 303369 7040 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 63850 1073 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 61097 1467 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14347 166 10.4 846,006
Riverside 67299
1305
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 303369 cases across LA County, including 7040 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 13 new deaths and 1,292 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13574

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 459 36,478
La Verne 555 32,206
Pomona 6230 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1599 77,000

Policy

  • Washington, Oregon and Nevada have joined California’s COVID-19 Scientific Safety Review Workgroup, established by California Gov. Newsom to independently review the safety and efficacy of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The panel will prioritize vaccine distribution to ensure COVID-19 vaccine is available to everyone, especially communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this disease.
  • Congress has recessed for what will be consequential November elections without passing new economic relief for a nation beset with the coronavirus pandemic. Democrats have sought more robust funding for state and local governments, while Republicans have opposed bailouts for states they view as chronically mismanaged. GOP senators have balked at any deal that could cost roughly $2 trillion, as contemplated by Democrats and the Trump administration. (Roll Call)
  • Medical experts from Mayo Clinic propose establishing a centralized national coalition to coordinate hypothesis-driven clinical research trials for treatment and prevention of COVID-19. The proposal calls for a uniform standard of care to enable easier comparison among treatments at every trial stage. (Gianrico Farrugia, Tom Mihaljevic, and Andrew D. Badley STAT)
  • Europe reported more than 1.3 million new cases this past week, its highest single week count yet. With concerns the situation in Europe might soon spin out of control, governments are imposing curfews and social restrictions to avoid full-scale lockdowns that could hurt the economy and dim the upcoming holiday season. (NPR)
  • The Rockefeller Foundation will allocate $1 billion over the next three years to address the pandemic and its aftermath. It is the largest commitment in its 107-year history, and will primarily focus on expanding access to COVID-19 tests and vaccines, as well as investing in distributed green power sources for the more than 800 million people stuck in energy poverty. (Axios)

Latest research news

  • Should you worry about studies showing waning coronavirus antibodies? The answer is no. Medical experts say it is normal for levels of antibodies to drop after the body clears an infection, but immune cells carry a memory of the virus and can churn out fresh antibodies when needed. Although it is too early to know how long immunity to coronavirus lasts, worries about whether vaccines will help reach herd immunity are also unwarranted. (New York Times)
  • A study of 216 adult COVID-19 patients found that vitamin D levels are significantly lower in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to population-based controls of similar age and sex. Noteworthy, serum 25OHD values were lower in men than in women. The study did not find any relationship between vitamin D levels and the parameters of COVID-19 severity, such as ICU admission, the need for mechanical ventilation or mortality. (José L. Hernández et al. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism)
  • Analysis of COVID-19 antibody tests on more than 365,000 people in England between June 20 and September 28 shows the number of people testing positive for coronavirus antibodies dropped by 26.5 percent. across the study period, from almost 6 to 4.4 percent. The findings suggest that there may be a decline in the level of immunity in the population in the months following the first wave of the epidemic. (Imperial College London)
  • Findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial show that an immunosuppressive drug tocilizumab is not an effective treatment strategy. The drug has been thought to disrupt the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19 in moderately ill patients. According to the study, tocilizumab has no significant effect on the risk of intubation or death, on disease worsening, or on time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen. (John H. Stone et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • A study to be published next week in the Journal of Hospital Medicine analyzed 5,263 COVID-19 patient records treated at NYU Langone hospitals in New York City and Long Island between March 1 and August 8. Using a range of risk factors for the disease, as well as indicators of the severity of the illness upon hospitalization, the study shows the likelihood of death from COVID-19 was on average 22 percentage points lower in August than in March for most critically ill patients. (NYU Langone Health and NYU School of Medicine)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 26th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 43,174,685. Total deaths: 1,155,473. Total recoveries: 29,014,079.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,639,900. Total deaths: 225,247. Total recoveries: 3,422,878.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 898,029. Total deaths: 17,345.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 299760 6993 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 62619 1072 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 60431 1447 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 14240 164 10.4 846,006
Riverside 65902
1279
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 299760 cases across LA County, including 6956 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 4 new deaths and 830 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13327

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 438 36,478
La Verne 535 32,206
Pomona 6024 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1599 77,000

Policy

  • Europe reported more than 1.3 million new cases this past week, its highest single week count yet. With concerns the situation in Europe might soon spin out of control, governments are imposing curfews and social restrictions to avoid full-scale lockdowns that could hurt the economy and dim the upcoming holiday season. (NPR)
  • The Rockefeller Foundation will allocate $1 billion over the next three years to address the pandemic and its aftermath. It is the largest commitment in its 107-year history, and will primarily focus on expanding access to COVID-19 tests and vaccines, as well as investing in distributed green power sources for the more than 800 million people stuck in energy poverty. (Axios)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the antiviral drug Veklury (remdesivir) for use in adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older and weighing at least 40 kilograms (about 88 pounds) for treatment of COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Veklury should only be administered in a hospital or in a healthcare setting capable of providing acute care comparable to inpatient hospital care. Veklury is the first treatment for COVID-19 to receive FDA approval.
  • A successful reopening of schools will require better COVID-19 testing access and response planning. Screening for COVID-19 symptoms without testing might not avert outbreaks in schools. Schools could build a rapid-feedback loop among testing laboratories, the public health department, and potential contacts, in accordance with public health exceptions to privacy laws, to expedite disclosure of testing data. (Yasmin Rafiei and and Michelle M. Mello The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • The COVID-19 emergency paid sick leave provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) has helped mitigate the pandemic and reduced the number of COVID-19 cases, according to a study published inHealth Affairs. Set to expire at the end of December, FFCRA should be extended into 2021 until the public health emergency has abated. The FFCRA’s coverage should be expanded to include the millions of workers left out because of the size of their employer or the type of work they do. (Institute for Women’s Policy Research)

Latest research news

  • Findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial show that an immunosuppressive drug tocilizumab is not an effective treatment strategy. The drug has been thought to disrupt the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19 in moderately ill patients. According to the study, tocilizumab has no significant effect on the risk of intubation or death, on disease worsening, or on time to discontinuation of supplemental oxygen. (John H. Stone et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • A study to be published next week in the Journal of Hospital Medicine analyzed 5,263 COVID-19 patient records treated at NYU Langone hospitals in New York City and Long Island between March 1 and August 8. Using a range of risk factors for the disease, as well as indicators of the severity of the illness upon hospitalization, the study shows the likelihood of death from COVID-19 was on average 22 percentage points lower in August than in March for most critically ill patients. (NYU Langone Health and NYU School of Medicine)
  • Young, healthy people will be intentionally exposed to the coronavirus in a first-of-its kind human challenge trial, the UK government and the Open Orphan company running the study announced this week. The challenge will be in the high-level isolation unit of the Royal Free Hospital in north London. Proponents of COVID-19 challenge trials have argued that they can be run safely and ethically, and that their potential to quickly identify effective vaccines outweighs the low risks to participants. (Nature)
  • Two new peer-reviewed studies are showing a sharp drop in mortality among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The drop is seen in all groups, including older patients and those with underlying conditions, suggesting that physicians are getting better at helping patients survive the illness. (NPR)
  • A small-N study found waning antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 virus within five months after infection, raising the concern that naturally acquired humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 might not be long-lasting. In this study, neutralizing antibody titer decreased more in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients. (Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 24th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 41,866,558. Total deaths: 1,139,296. Total recoveries: 28,410,322.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,424,583. Total deaths: 223,226. Total recoveries: 3,353,056.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 880,724. Total deaths: 17,189.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 294065 6956 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 61550 1070 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 59448 1434 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13980 160 10.4 846,006
Riverside 65386
1279
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 290486 cases across LA County, including 6956 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 12 new deaths and 3579 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13327

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 438 36,478
La Verne 535 32,206
Pomona 6024 152,361
Montclair 1456 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3275 177,751
Upland 1599 77,000

Policy

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the antiviral drug Veklury (remdesivir) for use in adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older and weighing at least 40 kilograms (about 88 pounds) for treatment of COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Veklury should only be administered in a hospital or in a healthcare setting capable of providing acute care comparable to inpatient hospital care. Veklury is the first treatment for COVID-19 to receive FDA approval.
  • A successful reopening of schools will require better COVID-19 testing access and response planning. Screening for COVID-19 symptoms without testing might not avert outbreaks in schools. Schools could build a rapid-feedback loop among testing laboratories, the public health department, and potential contacts, in accordance with public health exceptions to privacy laws, to expedite disclosure of testing data. (Yasmin Rafiei and and Michelle M. Mello The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • The COVID-19 emergency paid sick leave provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) has helped mitigate the pandemic and reduced the number of COVID-19 cases, according to a study published inHealth Affairs. Set to expire at the end of December, FFCRA should be extended into 2021 until the public health emergency has abated. The FFCRA’s coverage should be expanded to include the millions of workers left out because of the size of their employer or the type of work they do. (Institute for Women’s Policy Research)
  • The new survey data show a sharp disparity by race in willingness to be vaccinated as soon as the COVID-19 vaccine is available. The poll found that 59 percent of white Americans indicated they would get vaccinated as soon as a vaccine is ready, a decline from 70 percent in mid-August. Only 43 percent of Black individuals said they would pursue a vaccine as soon as it is available, a down from 65 percent in mid-August. (STAT)
  • With the first coronavirus vaccines in the final stages of testing, the bi-partisan National Governors Association is questioning financing and distribution of vaccines among states. It remains unclear whether vaccines will be allocated based on state total population, or according to the number of people at the highest risk of infection, or by some other rubric. (New York Times)

Latest research news

  • A study to be published next week in the Journal of Hospital Medicine analyzed 5,263 COVID-19 patient records treated at NYU Langone hospitals in New York City and Long Island between March 1 and August 8. Using a range of risk factors for the disease, as well as indicators of the severity of the illness upon hospitalization, the study shows the likelihood of death from COVID-19 was on average 22 percentage points lower in August than in March for most critically ill patients. (NYU Langone Health and NYU School of Medicine)
  • Young, healthy people will be intentionally exposed to the coronavirus in a first-of-its kind human challenge trial, the UK government and the Open Orphan company running the study announced this week. The challenge will be in the high-level isolation unit of the Royal Free Hospital in north London. Proponents of COVID-19 challenge trials have argued that they can be run safely and ethically, and that their potential to quickly identify effective vaccines outweighs the low risks to participants. (Nature)
  • Two new peer-reviewed studies are showing a sharp drop in mortality among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The drop is seen in all groups, including older patients and those with underlying conditions, suggesting that physicians are getting better at helping patients survive the illness. (NPR)
  • A small-N study found waning antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 virus within five months after infection, raising the concern that naturally acquired humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 might not be long-lasting. In this study, neutralizing antibody titer decreased more in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients. (Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • Nationally, the percentage of tests positive for SARS-CoV-2 and the percentage of visits to emergency departments or outpatient providers for COVID-like illness and influenza-like illness have increased slightly in the past two weeks. Percent positivity decreased slightly among those 18-49 years but increased among the other age groups. The fatality rate, while declining, remains above the epidemic threshold. (CDC Weekly Surveillance Summary)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 22nd, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 41,372,930. Total deaths: 1,133,356. Total recoveries: 28,186,372.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,347,982. Total deaths: 222,324. Total recoveries: 3,323,354.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 877,784. Total deaths: 17,027.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 290486 6944 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 60945 1065 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 59448 1423 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13980 160 10.4 846,006
Riverside 65056
1275
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 290486 cases across LA County, including 6944 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 57 new deaths and 1120 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13086

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 425 36,478
La Verne 530 32,206
Pomona 5894 152,361
Montclair 1425 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3233 177,751
Upland 1579 77,000

Policy

  • A successful reopening of schools will require better COVID-19 testing access and response planning. Screening for COVID-19 symptoms without testing might not avert outbreaks in schools. Schools could build a rapid-feedback loop among testing laboratories, the public health department, and potential contacts, in accordance with public health exceptions to privacy laws, to expedite disclosure of testing data. (Yasmin Rafiei and and Michelle M. Mello The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • The COVID-19 emergency paid sick leave provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) has helped mitigate the pandemic and reduced the number of COVID-19 cases, according to a study published inHealth Affairs. Set to expire at the end of December, FFCRA should be extended into 2021 until the public health emergency has abated. The FFCRA’s coverage should be expanded to include the millions of workers left out because of the size of their employer or the type of work they do. (Institute for Women’s Policy Research)
  • The new survey data show a sharp disparity by race in willingness to be vaccinated as soon as the COVID-19 vaccine is available. The poll found that 59 percent of white Americans indicated they would get vaccinated as soon as a vaccine is ready, a decline from 70 percent in mid-August. Only 43 percent of Black individuals said they would pursue a vaccine as soon as it is available, a down from 65 percent in mid-August. (STAT)
  • With the first coronavirus vaccines in the final stages of testing, the bi-partisan National Governors Association is questioning financing and distribution of vaccines among states. It remains unclear whether vaccines will be allocated based on state total population, or according to the number of people at the highest risk of infection, or by some other rubric. (New York Times)
  • Colleges are recording a national enrollment drop during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-year students declined 16.1 percent, accounting for 69 percent of all enrollment losses at the undergraduate level nationally. Community colleges are showing the greatest losses (9.4 percent), while graduate enrollment grew far more than in the previous fall, with the largest gain in public four-year colleges (4 percent). (National Student Clearinghouse Research Center)

Latest research news

  • Young, healthy people will be intentionally exposed to the coronavirus in a first-of-its kind human challenge trial, the UK government and the Open Orphan company running the study announced this week. The challenge will be in the high-level isolation unit of the Royal Free Hospital in north London. Proponents of COVID-19 challenge trials have argued that they can be run safely and ethically, and that their potential to quickly identify effective vaccines outweighs the low risks to participants. (Nature)
  • Two new peer-reviewed studies are showing a sharp drop in mortality among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The drop is seen in all groups, including older patients and those with underlying conditions, suggesting that physicians are getting better at helping patients survive the illness. (NPR)
  • A small-N study found waning antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 virus within five months after infection, raising the concern that naturally acquired humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 might not be long-lasting. In this study, neutralizing antibody titer decreased more in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients. (Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • Nationally, the percentage of tests positive for SARS-CoV-2 and the percentage of visits to emergency departments or outpatient providers for COVID-like illness and influenza-like illness have increased slightly in the past two weeks. Percent positivity decreased slightly among those 18-49 years but increased among the other age groups. The fatality rate, while declining, remains above the epidemic threshold. (CDC Weekly Surveillance Summary)
  • A study by the World Health Organization found that remdesivir, an antiviral widely used to treat COVID-19 hospitalized patients, did not reduce death rates in a multinational trial. Inconsistent treatment protocols conducted in diverse health care systems in various countries might be a factor to consider. (New York Times)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 22nd, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 40,914,651. Total deaths: 1,126,562. Total recoveries: 27,964,578.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,277,961. Total deaths: 221,150. Total recoveries: 3,295,426.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 874,077. Total deaths: 16,992.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 289366 6877 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 60621 1028 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 57373 1412 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13777 160 10.4 846,006
Riverside 64668
1273
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 289366 cases across LA County, including 6877 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 22 new deaths and 2144 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 13086

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 425 36,478
La Verne 530 32,206
Pomona 5894 152,361
Montclair 1425 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3233 177,751
Upland 1579 77,000

Policy

  • The COVID-19 emergency paid sick leave provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) has helped mitigate the pandemic and reduced the number of COVID-19 cases, according to a study published inHealth Affairs. Set to expire at the end of December, FFCRA should be extended into 2021 until the public health emergency has abated. The FFCRA’s coverage should be expanded to include the millions of workers left out because of the size of their employer or the type of work they do. (Institute for Women’s Policy Research)
  • The new survey data show a sharp disparity by race in willingness to be vaccinated as soon as the COVID-19 vaccine is available. The poll found that 59 percent of white Americans indicated they would get vaccinated as soon as a vaccine is ready, a decline from 70 percent in mid-August. Only 43 percent of Black individuals said they would pursue a vaccine as soon as it is available, a down from 65 percent in mid-August. (STAT)
  • With the first coronavirus vaccines in the final stages of testing, the bi-partisan National Governors Association is questioning financing and distribution of vaccines among states. It remains unclear whether vaccines will be allocated based on state total population, or according to the number of people at the highest risk of infection, or by some other rubric. (New York Times)
  • Colleges are recording a national enrollment drop during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-year students declined 16.1 percent, accounting for 69 percent of all enrollment losses at the undergraduate level nationally. Community colleges are showing the greatest losses (9.4 percent), while graduate enrollment grew far more than in the previous fall, with the largest gain in public four-year colleges (4 percent). (National Student Clearinghouse Research Center)
  • The first round of global COVID-19 vaccinations likely will go to frontline workers, health care professionals and older people. Healthy young people might not get the coronavirus vaccine until 2022, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The United States is working toward having a vaccine for mass availability by spring 2021. (The Hill)

Latest research news

  • Two new peer-reviewed studies are showing a sharp drop in mortality among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The drop is seen in all groups, including older patients and those with underlying conditions, suggesting that physicians are getting better at helping patients survive the illness. (NPR)
  • A small-N study found waning antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 virus within five months after infection, raising the concern that naturally acquired humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 might not be long-lasting. In this study, neutralizing antibody titer decreased more in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients. (Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • Nationally, the percentage of tests positive for SARS-CoV-2 and the percentage of visits to emergency departments or outpatient providers for COVID-like illness and influenza-like illness have increased slightly in the past two weeks. Percent positivity decreased slightly among those 18-49 years but increased among the other age groups. The fatality rate, while declining, remains above the epidemic threshold. (CDC Weekly Surveillance Summary)
  • A study by the World Health Organization found that remdesivir, an antiviral widely used to treat COVID-19 hospitalized patients, did not reduce death rates in a multinational trial. Inconsistent treatment protocols conducted in diverse health care systems in various countries might be a factor to consider. (New York Times)
  • An observational study of 60 patients in Germany found that previous infections with seasonal coronaviruses might protect against a severe course of the SARS-CoV-2 disease. It was shown that elevated antibody levels for HCoVs OC43 and HKU1 were associated with less need for intensive care therapy. (Martin Dugas et al. medRxiv)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 20th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 40,489,201. Total deaths: 1,119,620. Total recoveries: 27,747,459.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,217,952. Total deaths: 220,185. Total recoveries: 3,272,603.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 870,791. Total deaths: 16,970.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 289366 6877 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 59779 1021 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 56587 1401 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13597 160 10.4 846,006
Riverside 64075
1272
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 289366 cases across LA County, including 6877 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 22 new deaths and 2144 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12999

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 425 36,478
La Verne 530 32,206
Pomona 5894 152,361
Montclair 1410 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3184 177,751
Upland 1556 77,000

Policy

  • The new survey data show a sharp disparity by race in willingness to be vaccinated as soon as the COVID-19 vaccine is available. The poll found that 59 percent of white Americans indicated they would get vaccinated as soon as a vaccine is ready, a decline from 70 percent in mid-August. Only 43 percent of Black individuals said they would pursue a vaccine as soon as it is available, a down from 65 percent in mid-August. (STAT)
  • With the first coronavirus vaccines in the final stages of testing, the bi-partisan National Governors Association is questioning financing and distribution of vaccines among states. It remains unclear whether vaccines will be allocated based on state total population, or according to the number of people at the highest risk of infection, or by some other rubric. (New York Times)
  • Colleges are recording a national enrollment drop during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-year students declined 16.1 percent, accounting for 69 percent of all enrollment losses at the undergraduate level nationally. Community colleges are showing the greatest losses (9.4 percent), while graduate enrollment grew far more than in the previous fall, with the largest gain in public four-year colleges (4 percent). (National Student Clearinghouse Research Center)
  • The first round of global COVID-19 vaccinations likely will go to frontline workers, health care professionals and older people. Healthy young people might not get the coronavirus vaccine until 2022, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The United States is working toward having a vaccine for mass availability by spring 2021. (The Hill)
  • The Senate will vote on a limited coronavirus stimulus bill this month, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, as lawmakers stumble in their push to send aid to Americans before the 2020 election. The bill will target relief to American voters, including new funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans. Democrats, who blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican plan in the Senate last month, could dismiss the latest GOP proposal as inadequate. (CNBC)

Latest research news

  • A small-N study found waning antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 virus within five months after infection, raising the concern that naturally acquired humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 might not be long-lasting. In this study, neutralizing antibody titer decreased more in symptomatic than asymptomatic patients. (Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • Nationally, the percentage of tests positive for SARS-CoV-2 and the percentage of visits to emergency departments or outpatient providers for COVID-like illness and influenza-like illness have increased slightly in the past two weeks. Percent positivity decreased slightly among those 18-49 years but increased among the other age groups. The fatality rate, while declining, remains above the epidemic threshold. (CDC Weekly Surveillance Summary)
  • A study by the World Health Organization found that remdesivir, an antiviral widely used to treat COVID-19 hospitalized patients, did not reduce death rates in a multinational trial. Inconsistent treatment protocols conducted in diverse health care systems in various countries might be a factor to consider. (New York Times)
  • An observational study of 60 patients in Germany found that previous infections with seasonal coronaviruses might protect against a severe course of the SARS-CoV-2 disease. It was shown that elevated antibody levels for HCoVs OC43 and HKU1 were associated with less need for intensive care therapy. (Martin Dugas et al. medRxiv)
  • A clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a potential safety concern. Eli Lilly is one of several companies pursuing experimental treatments for Covid-19 that use monoclonal antibodies — mass-produced mimics of immune molecules that the human body produces in reaction to the coronavirus. (New York Times)
  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 19th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 40,122,835. Total deaths: 1,114,857. Total recoveries: 27,536,738.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 8,157,704. Total deaths: 219,706. Total recoveries: 3,234,138.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 867,317. Total deaths: 16,943.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 287222 6855 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 59463 989 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 56587 1401 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13597 160 10.4 846,006
Riverside 63284
1269
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 287222 cases across LA County, including 6855 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 21 new deaths and 1039 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12932

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 421 36,478
La Verne 529 32,206
Pomona 5868 152,361
Montclair 1399 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3166 177,751
Upland 1549 77,000

Policy

  • With the first coronavirus vaccines in the final stages of testing, the bi-partisan National Governors Association is questioning financing and distribution of vaccines among states. It remains unclear whether vaccines will be allocated based on state total population, or according to the number of people at the highest risk of infection, or by some other rubric. (New York Times)
  • Colleges are recording a national enrollment drop during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-year students declined 16.1 percent, accounting for 69 percent of all enrollment losses at the undergraduate level nationally. Community colleges are showing the greatest losses (9.4 percent), while graduate enrollment grew far more than in the previous fall, with the largest gain in public four-year colleges (4 percent). (National Student Clearinghouse Research Center)
  • The first round of global COVID-19 vaccinations likely will go to frontline workers, health care professionals and older people. Healthy young people might not get the coronavirus vaccine until 2022, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The United States is working toward having a vaccine for mass availability by spring 2021. (The Hill)
  • The Senate will vote on a limited coronavirus stimulus bill this month, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, as lawmakers stumble in their push to send aid to Americans before the 2020 election. The bill will target relief to American voters, including new funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans. Democrats, who blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican plan in the Senate last month, could dismiss the latest GOP proposal as inadequate. (CNBC)
  • Most IMF loans to help poor countries through the pandemic recommend adoption of tough austerity measures, according to an Oxfam analysis. The report warns that austerity could worsen poverty and inequality and increase vulnerability to COVID-19.

Latest research news

  • Nationally, the percentage of tests positive for SARS-CoV-2 and the percentage of visits to emergency departments or outpatient providers for COVID-like illness and influenza-like illness have increased slightly in the past two weeks. Percent positivity decreased slightly among those 18-49 years but increased among the other age groups. The fatality rate, while declining, remains above the epidemic threshold. (CDC Weekly Surveillance Summary)
  • A study by the World Health Organization found that remdesivir, an antiviral widely used to treat COVID-19 hospitalized patients, did not reduce death rates in a multinational trial. Inconsistent treatment protocols conducted in diverse health care systems in various countries might be a factor to consider. (New York Times)
  • An observational study of 60 patients in Germany found that previous infections with seasonal coronaviruses might protect against a severe course of the SARS-CoV-2 disease. It was shown that elevated antibody levels for HCoVs OC43 and HKU1 were associated with less need for intensive care therapy. (Martin Dugas et al. medRxiv)
  • A clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a potential safety concern. Eli Lilly is one of several companies pursuing experimental treatments for Covid-19 that use monoclonal antibodies — mass-produced mimics of immune molecules that the human body produces in reaction to the coronavirus. (New York Times)
  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)
  • The 60,000-patient clinical trial of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine has been paused due to an unexplained illness in a study participant. It is not yet known whether the participant received a vaccine study treatment or a placebo. (STAT)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 17, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 39,032,342. Total deaths: 1,099,950. Total recoveries: 26,942,946.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,988,893. Total deaths: 217,904. Total recoveries: 3,177,397.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 858,401. Total deaths: 16,757.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 286183 6834 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 59169 988 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 56436 1391 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13541 159 10.4 846,006
Riverside 63125
1269
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 286183 cases across LA County, including 6834 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 22 new deaths and 1167 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12886

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 421 36,478
La Verne 529 32,206
Pomona 5861 152,361
Montclair 1388 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3146 177,751
Upland 1541 77,000

Policy

  • Colleges are recording a national enrollment drop during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-year students declined 16.1 percent, accounting for 69 percent of all enrollment losses at the undergraduate level nationally. Community colleges are showing the greatest losses (9.4 percent), while graduate enrollment grew far more than in the previous fall, with the largest gain in public four-year colleges (4 percent). (National Student Clearinghouse Research Center)
  • The first round of global COVID-19 vaccinations likely will go to frontline workers, health care professionals and older people. Healthy young people might not get the coronavirus vaccine until 2022, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The United States is working toward having a vaccine for mass availability by spring 2021. (The Hill)
  • The Senate will vote on a limited coronavirus stimulus bill this month, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, as lawmakers stumble in their push to send aid to Americans before the 2020 election. The bill will target relief to American voters, including new funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans. Democrats, who blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican plan in the Senate last month, could dismiss the latest GOP proposal as inadequate. (CNBC)
  • Most IMF loans to help poor countries through the pandemic recommend adoption of tough austerity measures, according to an Oxfam analysis. The report warns that austerity could worsen poverty and inequality and increase vulnerability to COVID-19.
  • The world is experiencing a weak recovery from the COVID-19 recession. Governments have little choice but aggressive fiscal stimulus on top of already high public debt, juxtaposed against the risks of even greater and long-lasting scarring of economies in the absence of such stimulus. The global low interest rate environment will limit interest payment burdens, and, rather than crowding out private investment as in normal times, well-targeted government expenditures could serve as a catalyst for economic recovery. (Brookings)

Latest research news

  • A study by the World Health Organization found that remdesivir, an antiviral widely used to treat COVID-19 hospitalized patients, did not reduce death rates in a multinational trial. Inconsistent treatment protocols conducted in diverse health care systems in various countries might be a factor to consider. (New York Times)
  • An observational study of 60 patients in Germany found that previous infections with seasonal coronaviruses might protect against a severe course of the SARS-CoV-2 disease. It was shown that elevated antibody levels for HCoVs OC43 and HKU1 were associated with less need for intensive care therapy. (Martin Dugas et al. medRxiv)
  • A clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a potential safety concern. Eli Lilly is one of several companies pursuing experimental treatments for Covid-19 that use monoclonal antibodies — mass-produced mimics of immune molecules that the human body produces in reaction to the coronavirus. (New York Times)
  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)
  • The 60,000-patient clinical trial of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine has been paused due to an unexplained illness in a study participant. It is not yet known whether the participant received a vaccine study treatment or a placebo. (STAT)
  • An experimental study demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for significantly longer time than generally considered possible. A viable virus can survive on common surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and both paper and polymer banknotes for up to 28 days at 20 degrees Celsius. On some at 40 degree Celsius, however, infectious virus survived less than 24 hours. (Shane Riddell et al. Virology Journal)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 16, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 38,599,508. Total deaths: 1,093,548. Total recoveries: 26,728,206.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,920,386. Total deaths: 216,933. Total recoveries: 3,155,794.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 855,072. Total deaths: 16,639.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 285016 6812 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 58936 986 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 56283 1360 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13491 158 10.4 846,006
Riverside 62900
1264
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 285016 cases across LA County, including 6812 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 32 new deaths and 2266 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12819

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 418 36,478
La Verne 528 32,206
Pomona 5822 152,361
Montclair 1384 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3137 177,751
Upland 1530 77,000

Policy

  • The first round of global COVID-19 vaccinations likely will go to frontline workers, health care professionals and older people. Healthy young people might not get the coronavirus vaccine until 2022, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The United States is working toward having a vaccine for mass availability by spring 2021. (The Hill)
  • The Senate will vote on a limited coronavirus stimulus bill this month, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, as lawmakers stumble in their push to send aid to Americans before the 2020 election. The bill will target relief to American voters, including new funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans. Democrats, who blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican plan in the Senate last month, could dismiss the latest GOP proposal as inadequate. (CNBC)
  • Most IMF loans to help poor countries through the pandemic recommend adoption of tough austerity measures, according to an Oxfam analysis. The report warns that austerity could worsen poverty and inequality and increase vulnerability to COVID-19.
  • The world is experiencing a weak recovery from the COVID-19 recession. Governments have little choice but aggressive fiscal stimulus on top of already high public debt, juxtaposed against the risks of even greater and long-lasting scarring of economies in the absence of such stimulus. The global low interest rate environment will limit interest payment burdens, and, rather than crowding out private investment as in normal times, well-targeted government expenditures could serve as a catalyst for economic recovery. (Brookings)
  • Regeneron has applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its experimental monoclonal antibody therapy for treating COVID-19. The antibody therapy is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that is designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. Regeneron’s experimental antibody treatment is still in large-scale clinical trials, but has been available for compassionate use, something the FDA has to approve on an individual basis, as it did for the President. (CNN)

Latest research news

  • An observational study of 60 patients in Germany found that previous infections with seasonal coronaviruses might protect against a severe course of the SARS-CoV-2 disease. It was shown that elevated antibody levels for HCoVs OC43 and HKU1 were associated with less need for intensive care therapy. (Martin Dugas et al. medRxiv)
  • A clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a potential safety concern. Eli Lilly is one of several companies pursuing experimental treatments for Covid-19 that use monoclonal antibodies — mass-produced mimics of immune molecules that the human body produces in reaction to the coronavirus. (New York Times)
  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)
  • The 60,000-patient clinical trial of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine has been paused due to an unexplained illness in a study participant. It is not yet known whether the participant received a vaccine study treatment or a placebo. (STAT)
  • An experimental study demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for significantly longer time than generally considered possible. A viable virus can survive on common surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and both paper and polymer banknotes for up to 28 days at 20 degrees Celsius. On some at 40 degree Celsius, however, infectious virus survived less than 24 hours. (Shane Riddell et al. Virology Journal)
  • South Korean drugmaker Celltrion has received regulatory approval for Phase 3 clinical trials of an experimental COVID-19 treatment. The approval comes as the company plans to seek conditional approval for its antibody drug, CT-P59, for emergency use by the end of this year. (Reuters)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 15, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 38,275,349. Total deaths: 1,088,051. Total recoveries: 26,525,617.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,864,910. Total deaths: 216,060. Total recoveries: 3,124,593.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 852,406. Total deaths: 16,581.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 283750 6790 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 58579 986 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 56070 1341 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13438 158 10.4 846,006
Riverside 62553
1258
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 283750 cases across LA County, including 6790 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 17 new deaths and 768 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12775

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 415 36,478
La Verne 522 32,206
Pomona 5822 152,361
Montclair 1371 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3124 177,751
Upland 1521 77,000

Policy

  • The Senate will vote on a limited coronavirus stimulus bill this month, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday, as lawmakers stumble in their push to send aid to Americans before the 2020 election. The bill will target relief to American voters, including new funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans. Democrats, who blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican plan in the Senate last month, could dismiss the latest GOP proposal as inadequate. (CNBC)
  • Most IMF loans to help poor countries through the pandemic recommend adoption of tough austerity measures, according to an Oxfam analysis. The report warns that austerity could worsen poverty and inequality and increase vulnerability to COVID-19.
  • The world is experiencing a weak recovery from the COVID-19 recession. Governments have little choice but aggressive fiscal stimulus on top of already high public debt, juxtaposed against the risks of even greater and long-lasting scarring of economies in the absence of such stimulus. The global low interest rate environment will limit interest payment burdens, and, rather than crowding out private investment as in normal times, well-targeted government expenditures could serve as a catalyst for economic recovery. (Brookings)
  • Regeneron has applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its experimental monoclonal antibody therapy for treating COVID-19. The antibody therapy is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that is designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. Regeneron’s experimental antibody treatment is still in large-scale clinical trials, but has been available for compassionate use, something the FDA has to approve on an individual basis, as it did for the President. (CNN)
  • California has not seen a link between the reopening of K-12 schools for in-person learning and increased coronavirus transmission, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Mark Ghaly, said Tuesday. It can take time for trends to emerge, but so far, the results are encouraging. (KABC-TV)

Latest research news

  • A clinical trial that is testing an antibody treatment for COVID-19 developed by the drugmaker Eli Lilly has been paused because of a potential safety concern. Eli Lilly is one of several companies pursuing experimental treatments for Covid-19 that use monoclonal antibodies — mass-produced mimics of immune molecules that the human body produces in reaction to the coronavirus. (New York Times)
  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)
  • The 60,000-patient clinical trial of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine has been paused due to an unexplained illness in a study participant. It is not yet known whether the participant received a vaccine study treatment or a placebo. (STAT)
  • An experimental study demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for significantly longer time than generally considered possible. A viable virus can survive on common surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and both paper and polymer banknotes for up to 28 days at 20 degrees Celsius. On some at 40 degree Celsius, however, infectious virus survived less than 24 hours. (Shane Riddell et al. Virology Journal)
  • South Korean drugmaker Celltrion has received regulatory approval for Phase 3 clinical trials of an experimental COVID-19 treatment. The approval comes as the company plans to seek conditional approval for its antibody drug, CT-P59, for emergency use by the end of this year. (Reuters)
  • A genetic analysis of 192 coronavirus patients shows that during the early months of the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to Southern California from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (Wenjuan Zhang et al. JAMA Infectious Diseases)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 14, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 37,894,452. Total deaths: 1,082,201. Total recoveries: 26,328,960.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,806,186. Total deaths: 215,251. Total recoveries: 3,106,728.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 850,028. Total deaths: 16,572.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 282982 6773 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 58125 986 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 55892 1341 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13423 158 10.4 846,006
Riverside 61824
1256
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 282982 cases across LA County, including 6773 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 32 new deaths and 3073 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12693

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 410 36,478
La Verne 519 32,206
Pomona 5803 152,361
Montclair 1354 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3095 177,751
Upland 1512 77,000

Policy

  • Most IMF loans to help poor countries through the pandemic recommend adoption of tough austerity measures, according to an Oxfam analysis. The report warns that austerity could worsen poverty and inequality and increase vulnerability to COVID-19.
  • The world is experiencing a weak recovery from the COVID-19 recession. Governments have little choice but aggressive fiscal stimulus on top of already high public debt, juxtaposed against the risks of even greater and long-lasting scarring of economies in the absence of such stimulus. The global low interest rate environment will limit interest payment burdens, and, rather than crowding out private investment as in normal times, well-targeted government expenditures could serve as a catalyst for economic recovery. (Brookings)
  • Regeneron has applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its experimental monoclonal antibody therapy for treating COVID-19. The antibody therapy is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that is designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. Regeneron’s experimental antibody treatment is still in large-scale clinical trials, but has been available for compassionate use, something the FDA has to approve on an individual basis, as it did for the President. (CNN)
  • California has not seen a link between the reopening of K-12 schools for in-person learning and increased coronavirus transmission, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Mark Ghaly, said Tuesday. It can take time for trends to emerge, but so far, the results are encouraging. (KABC-TV)
  • America’s economic rebound might falter without further financial aid from the federal government, Fed Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, exacerbating existing inequalities, as reported by CBS News. Meanwhile, President Trump halted negotiations for a new stimulus package until after the elections. (CNN)

Latest research news

  • Genomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in a 25-year-old Nevada man shows coronavirus re-infection with two genetically distinct viral agents. The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first. (Richard Tillett et al. The Lancet)
  • The 60,000-patient clinical trial of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine has been paused due to an unexplained illness in a study participant. It is not yet known whether the participant received a vaccine study treatment or a placebo. (STAT)
  • An experimental study demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for significantly longer time than generally considered possible. A viable virus can survive on common surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and both paper and polymer banknotes for up to 28 days at 20 degrees Celsius. On some at 40 degree Celsius, however, infectious virus survived less than 24 hours. (Shane Riddell et al. Virology Journal)
  • South Korean drugmaker Celltrion has received regulatory approval for Phase 3 clinical trials of an experimental COVID-19 treatment. The approval comes as the company plans to seek conditional approval for its antibody drug, CT-P59, for emergency use by the end of this year. (Reuters)
  • A genetic analysis of 192 coronavirus patients shows that during the early months of the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to Southern California from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (Wenjuan Zhang et al. JAMA Infectious Diseases)
  • A household survey of private households in the UK, excluding people living in care homes, other communal establishments and hospitals, shows that 76.5 percent who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 reported no symptoms, and 86.1 percent reported none of the symptoms specific to COVID-19 such as cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell. A more widespread testing program is necessary to capture “silent” transmission and potentially prevent and reduce future outbreaks. (Irene Petersen and Andrew Phillips Clinical Epidemiology)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 12, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 37,594,267. Total deaths: 1,077,836. Total recoveries: 26,116,750.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,768,629. Total deaths: 214,844. Total recoveries: 3,075,077.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 846,579. Total deaths: 16,564.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Los Angeles County is still in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier economic-reopening roadmap. The county’s recent testing positivity rate is low enough to qualify the county to move up to a less-restrictive tier, but the average daily number of new cases needs to drop to about 700 per day before any movement will occur. (NBC)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 279909 6741 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 57517 984 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 55345 1316 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13226 158 10.4 846,006
Riverside 61824
1256
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 279909 cases across LA County, including 6741 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 15 new deaths and 1244 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12547

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 408 36,478
La Verne 512 32,206
Pomona 5737 152,361
Montclair 1341 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3052 177,751
Upland 1497 77,000

Policy

  • The world is experiencing a weak recovery from the COVID-19 recession. Governments have little choice but aggressive fiscal stimulus on top of already high public debt, juxtaposed against the risks of even greater and long-lasting scarring of economies in the absence of such stimulus. The global low interest rate environment will limit interest payment burdens, and, rather than crowding out private investment as in normal times, well-targeted government expenditures could serve as a catalyst for economic recovery. (Brookings)
  • Regeneron has applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its experimental monoclonal antibody therapy for treating COVID-19. The antibody therapy is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that is designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. Regeneron’s experimental antibody treatment is still in large-scale clinical trials, but has been available for compassionate use, something the FDA has to approve on an individual basis, as it did for the President. (CNN)
  • California has not seen a link between the reopening of K-12 schools for in-person learning and increased coronavirus transmission, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Mark Ghaly, said Tuesday. It can take time for trends to emerge, but so far, the results are encouraging. (KABC-TV)
  • America’s economic rebound might falter without further financial aid from the federal government, Fed Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, exacerbating existing inequalities, as reported by CBS News. Meanwhile, President Trump halted negotiations for a new stimulus package until after the elections. (CNN)
  • The race for a COVID-19 vaccine slowed Tuesday, as the FDA released strengthened rules for authorizing any COVID-19 vaccine on an emergency basis. The co-chair of Operation Warp Speed, Moncef Slaoui, revealed that the government’s vaccine fast-tracking effort has urged manufacturers not to apply for emergency use authorization until they have significant amounts of vaccines to deploy. This could push back even the first such authorization – expected to be for a vaccine being made by Pfizer and BioNTech, if it proves to be effective – into sometime in mid- to late November. (STAT)

Latest research news

  • An experimental study demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for significantly longer time than generally considered possible. A viable virus can survive on common surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and both paper and polymer banknotes for up to 28 days at 20 degrees Celsius. On some at 40 degree Celsius, however, infectious virus survived less than 24 hours. (Shane Riddell et al. Virology Journal)
  • South Korean drugmaker Celltrion has received regulatory approval for Phase 3 clinical trials of an experimental COVID-19 treatment. The approval comes as the company plans to seek conditional approval for its antibody drug, CT-P59, for emergency use by the end of this year. (Reuters)
  • A genetic analysis of 192 coronavirus patients shows that during the early months of the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to Southern California from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (Wenjuan Zhang et al. JAMA Infectious Diseases)
  • A household survey of private households in the UK, excluding people living in care homes, other communal establishments and hospitals, shows that 76.5 percent who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 reported no symptoms, and 86.1 percent reported none of the symptoms specific to COVID-19 such as cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell. A more widespread testing program is necessary to capture “silent” transmission and potentially prevent and reduce future outbreaks. (Irene Petersen and Andrew Phillips Clinical Epidemiology)
  • Results of a randomized trial assessing lopinavir-ritonavir treatment for COVID-19 show that this combination of antiviral drugs is not effective and not associated with reductions in 28-day mortality, duration of hospital stay, or risk of progressing to invasive mechanical ventilation or death. (RECOVERY Collaborative Group The Lancet)
  • A study of 509 hospitalized patients in Chicago, Illinois, shows that the most frequent neurologic manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, and dizziness. Encephalopathy was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, independent of respiratory disease severity. Independent risk factors for developing any neurologic manifestation were severe COVID-19 and younger age. (Eric M. Liotta et al. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 9th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 36,625,213. Total deaths: 1,063,381. Total recoveries: 25,502,811.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,611,616. Total deaths: 212,840. Total recoveries: 3,021,252.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 834,800. Total deaths: 16,361.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 278665 6726 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 57203 974 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 55183 1306 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13224 157 10.4 846,006
Riverside 61416
1248
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 278665 cases across LA County, including 6726 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 17 new deaths and 1220 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12500

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 407 36,478
La Verne 512 32,206
Pomona 5726 152,361
Montclair 1330 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3042 177,751
Upland 1493 77,000

Policy

  • Regeneron has applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its experimental monoclonal antibody therapy for treating COVID-19. The antibody therapy is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies that is designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. Regeneron’s experimental antibody treatment is still in large-scale clinical trials, but has been available for compassionate use, something the FDA has to approve on an individual basis, as it did for the President. (CNN)
  • California has not seen a link between the reopening of K-12 schools for in-person learning and increased coronavirus transmission, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Mark Ghaly, said Tuesday. It can take time for trends to emerge, but so far, the results are encouraging. (KABC-TV)
  • America’s economic rebound might falter without further financial aid from the federal government, Fed Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, exacerbating existing inequalities, as reported by CBS News. Meanwhile, President Trump halted negotiations for a new stimulus package until after the elections. (CNN)
  • The race for a COVID-19 vaccine slowed Tuesday, as the FDA released strengthened rules for authorizing any COVID-19 vaccine on an emergency basis. The co-chair of Operation Warp Speed, Moncef Slaoui, revealed that the government’s vaccine fast-tracking effort has urged manufacturers not to apply for emergency use authorization until they have significant amounts of vaccines to deploy. This could push back even the first such authorization – expected to be for a vaccine being made by Pfizer and BioNTech, if it proves to be effective – into sometime in mid- to late November. (STAT)
  • Year 2020 is the least quantitatively productive year in the California Capitol since at least 1967, due to restrictions stemming from the pandemic. The California Senate Office of Research reports the California legislature passed fewer than 428 bills to the governor this fall. The crunched calendar and the state’s gutted budget put a serious damper on legislators’ bill-passing ambitions. (CalMatters)

Latest research news

  • A genetic analysis of 192 coronavirus patients shows that during the early months of the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to Southern California from New York state via Europe, not directly from China. (Wenjuan Zhang et al. JAMA Infectious Diseases)
  • A household survey of private households in the UK, excluding people living in care homes, other communal establishments and hospitals, shows that 76.5 percent who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 reported no symptoms, and 86.1 percent reported none of the symptoms specific to COVID-19 such as cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell. A more widespread testing program is necessary to capture “silent” transmission and potentially prevent and reduce future outbreaks. (Irene Petersen and Andrew Phillips Clinical Epidemiology)
  • Results of a randomized trial assessing lopinavir-ritonavir treatment for COVID-19 show that this combination of antiviral drugs is not effective and not associated with reductions in 28-day mortality, duration of hospital stay, or risk of progressing to invasive mechanical ventilation or death. (RECOVERY Collaborative Group The Lancet)
  • A study of 509 hospitalized patients in Chicago, Illinois, shows that the most frequent neurologic manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, and dizziness. Encephalopathy was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, independent of respiratory disease severity. Independent risk factors for developing any neurologic manifestation were severe COVID-19 and younger age. (Eric M. Liotta et al. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology)
  • Younger adults have likely contributed to community transmission of COVID-19 in summer. In June 2020, across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, increases in percentage of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results among adults aged 20-39 years preceded increases among those aged  over 60 years by four to 15 days. Nationwide, the median age of COVID-19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. (Tegan K. Boehmer et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 8th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 36,238,849. Total deaths: 1,057,505. Total recoveries: 25,277,578.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,555,437. Total deaths: 211,917. Total recoveries: 2,999,895.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 831,225. Total deaths: 16,228.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 277445 6709 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 56823 967 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 55042 1292 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13147 157 10.4 846,006
Riverside 61133
1247
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 277445 cases across LA County, including 6709 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 28 new deaths and 1589 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12440

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 407 36,478
La Verne 511 32,206
Pomona 5702 152,361
Montclair 1316 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 3017 177,751
Upland 1487 77,000

Policy

  • California has not seen a link between the reopening of K-12 schools for in-person learning and increased coronavirus transmission, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Mark Ghaly, said Tuesday. It can take time for trends to emerge, but so far, the results are encouraging. (KABC-TV)
  • America’s economic rebound might falter without further financial aid from the federal government, Fed Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, exacerbating existing inequalities, as reported by CBS News. Meanwhile, President Trump halted negotiations for a new stimulus package until after the elections. (CNN)
  • The race for a COVID-19 vaccine slowed Tuesday, as the FDA released strengthened rules for authorizing any COVID-19 vaccine on an emergency basis. The co-chair of Operation Warp Speed, Moncef Slaoui, revealed that the government’s vaccine fast-tracking effort has urged manufacturers not to apply for emergency use authorization until they have significant amounts of vaccines to deploy. This could push back even the first such authorization – expected to be for a vaccine being made by Pfizer and BioNTech, if it proves to be effective – into sometime in mid- to late November. (STAT)
  • Year 2020 is the least quantitatively productive year in the California Capitol since at least 1967, due to restrictions stemming from the pandemic. The California Senate Office of Research reports the California legislature passed fewer than 428 bills to the governor this fall. The crunched calendar and the state’s gutted budget put a serious damper on legislators’ bill-passing ambitions. (CalMatters)
  • The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill last week in a 214-207 vote. The bill includes a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits, $436 billion in new state and local aid, $282 billion for education and childcare, and new money for the hard-hit airline and restaurant industries, among other provisions. Although the legislation is not expected to become law, it provides grounds for pre-electoral campaigning for incumbents from both parties. (Forbes)

Latest research news

  • A household survey of private households in the UK, excluding people living in care homes, other communal establishments and hospitals, shows that 76.5 percent who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 reported no symptoms, and 86.1 percent reported none of the symptoms specific to COVID-19 such as cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell. A more widespread testing program is necessary to capture “silent” transmission and potentially prevent and reduce future outbreaks. (Irene Petersen and Andrew Phillips Clinical Epidemiology)
  • Results of a randomized trial assessing lopinavir-ritonavir treatment for COVID-19 show that this combination of antiviral drugs is not effective and not associated with reductions in 28-day mortality, duration of hospital stay, or risk of progressing to invasive mechanical ventilation or death. (RECOVERY Collaborative Group The Lancet)
  • A study of 509 hospitalized patients in Chicago, Illinois, shows that the most frequent neurologic manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, and dizziness. Encephalopathy was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, independent of respiratory disease severity. Independent risk factors for developing any neurologic manifestation were severe COVID-19 and younger age. (Eric M. Liotta et al. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology)
  • Younger adults have likely contributed to community transmission of COVID-19 in summer. In June 2020, across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, increases in percentage of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results among adults aged 20-39 years preceded increases among those aged  over 60 years by four to 15 days. Nationwide, the median age of COVID-19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. (Tegan K. Boehmer et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 7th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 35,906,341. Total deaths: 1,051,446. Total recoveries: 25,018,241.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,506,743. Total deaths: 211,108. Total recoveries: 2,952,390.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 828,461. Total deaths: 16,177.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 275856 6681 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 56522 966 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 54898 1289 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13065 154 10.4 846,006
Riverside 60867
1244
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 275856 cases across LA County, including 6681 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 27 new deaths and 914 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12356

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 405 36,478
La Verne 505 32,206
Pomona 5668 152,361
Montclair 1315 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2989 177,751
Upland 1474 77,000

Policy

  • America’s economic rebound might falter without further financial aid from the federal government, Fed Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, exacerbating existing inequalities, as reported by CBS News. Meanwhile, President Trump halted negotiations for a new stimulus package until after the elections. (CNN)
  • The race for a COVID-19 vaccine slowed Tuesday, as the FDA released strengthened rules for authorizing any COVID-19 vaccine on an emergency basis. The co-chair of Operation Warp Speed, Moncef Slaoui, revealed that the government’s vaccine fast-tracking effort has urged manufacturers not to apply for emergency use authorization until they have significant amounts of vaccines to deploy. This could push back even the first such authorization – expected to be for a vaccine being made by Pfizer and BioNTech, if it proves to be effective – into sometime in mid- to late November. (STAT)
  • Year 2020 is the least quantitatively productive year in the California Capitol since at least 1967, due to restrictions stemming from the pandemic. The California Senate Office of Research reports the California legislature passed fewer than 428 bills to the governor this fall. The crunched calendar and the state’s gutted budget put a serious damper on legislators’ bill-passing ambitions. (CalMatters)
  • The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill last week in a 214-207 vote. The bill includes a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits, $436 billion in new state and local aid, $282 billion for education and childcare, and new money for the hard-hit airline and restaurant industries, among other provisions. Although the legislation is not expected to become law, it provides grounds for pre-electoral campaigning for incumbents from both parties. (Forbes)
  • Drugmakers Eli Lilly and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals each released positive data for COVID-19 antibody therapeutics they are developing as treatments and passive vaccines. Both companies are discussing their data with regulators, and there are reasons to believe their approval could come much quicker than expected, possibly before the Election Day. (Bloomberg)

Latest research news

  • Results of a randomized trial assessing lopinavir-ritonavir treatment for COVID-19 show that this combination of antiviral drugs is not effective and not associated with reductions in 28-day mortality, duration of hospital stay, or risk of progressing to invasive mechanical ventilation or death. (RECOVERY Collaborative Group The Lancet)
  • A study of 509 hospitalized patients in Chicago, Illinois, shows that the most frequent neurologic manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, and dizziness. Encephalopathy was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, independent of respiratory disease severity. Independent risk factors for developing any neurologic manifestation were severe COVID-19 and younger age. (Eric M. Liotta et al. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology)
  • Younger adults have likely contributed to community transmission of COVID-19 in summer. In June 2020, across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, increases in percentage of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results among adults aged 20-39 years preceded increases among those aged  over 60 years by four to 15 days. Nationwide, the median age of COVID-19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. (Tegan K. Boehmer et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)
  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 6th, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 35,547,863. Total deaths: 1,045,201. Total recoveries: 24,791,181.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,461,206. Total deaths: 210,237. Total recoveries: 2,935,142.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 826,784. Total deaths: 16,149.
    • Virus transmission in Los Angeles County is rated as widespread by the governor’s reopening regime, which places LA county in Tier 1 and keeps higher education and K-12 schools closed. Schools are permitted to open to stable groups of no more than 12 students with disabilities, students requiring instruction for English as a second language and students needing other specialized in-school services. Many businesses and services are allowed to reopen if performed outdoors with modifications. (Los Angeles Times)

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 274942 6654 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 56400 962 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 54760 1287 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 13045 154 10.4 846,006
Riverside 60738
1238
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 274942 cases across LA County, including 6654 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 28 new deaths and 1991 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12315

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 397 36,478
La Verne 501 32,206
Pomona 5651 152,361
Montclair 1310 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2985 177,751
Upland 1471 77,000

Policy

  • Year 2020 is the least quantitatively productive year in the California Capitol since at least 1967, due to restrictions stemming from the pandemic. The California Senate Office of Research reports the California legislature passed fewer than 428 bills to the governor this fall. The crunched calendar and the state’s gutted budget put a serious damper on legislators’ bill-passing ambitions. (CalMatters)
  • The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill last week in a 214-207 vote. The bill includes a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits, $436 billion in new state and local aid, $282 billion for education and childcare, and new money for the hard-hit airline and restaurant industries, among other provisions. Although the legislation is not expected to become law, it provides grounds for pre-electoral campaigning for incumbents from both parties. (Forbes)
  • Drugmakers Eli Lilly and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals each released positive data for COVID-19 antibody therapeutics they are developing as treatments and passive vaccines. Both companies are discussing their data with regulators, and there are reasons to believe their approval could come much quicker than expected, possibly before the Election Day. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have provided sweeping new labor protections for workers laid off during the pandemic by requiring hotel, airport and janitorial employers to rehire based on seniority. The protections pushed by labor groups targeted businesses, including event centers and building maintenance, that have let go a third of their workforce as a result of COVID-19. Gov. Newsom said the bill was too prescriptive and threatened to hurt the already devastated hospitality industry. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The federal government will begin distributing millions of rapid coronavirus tests to states this week, with governors urged to use the kits to reopen schools for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Abbott Laboratories tests will allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low. (Associated Press)

Latest research news

  • A study of 509 hospitalized patients in Chicago, Illinois, shows that the most frequent neurologic manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, and dizziness. Encephalopathy was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, independent of respiratory disease severity. Independent risk factors for developing any neurologic manifestation were severe COVID-19 and younger age. (Eric M. Liotta et al. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology)
  • Younger adults have likely contributed to community transmission of COVID-19 in summer. In June 2020, across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, increases in percentage of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results among adults aged 20-39 years preceded increases among those aged  over 60 years by four to 15 days. Nationwide, the median age of COVID-19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. (Tegan K. Boehmer et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)
  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 5, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 35,241,027. Total deaths: 1,038,151. Total recoveries: 24,546,798.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,420,206. Total deaths: 209,811. Total recoveries: 2,911,699.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 823,729. Total deaths: 16,120.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 272653 6626 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 56011 962 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 54118 1281 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12943 153 10.4 846,006
Riverside 59934
1231
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 272653 cases across LA County, including 6626 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 16 new deaths and 1382 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12217

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 391 36,478
La Verne 490 32,206
Pomona 5608 152,361
Montclair 1304 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2960 177,751
Upland 1464 77,000

Policy

  • The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill last week in a 214-207 vote. The bill includes a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits, $436 billion in new state and local aid, $282 billion for education and childcare, and new money for the hard-hit airline and restaurant industries, among other provisions. Although the legislation is not expected to become law, it provides grounds for pre-electoral campaigning for incumbents from both parties. (Forbes)
  • Drugmakers Eli Lilly and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals each released positive data for COVID-19 antibody therapeutics they are developing as treatments and passive vaccines. Both companies are discussing their data with regulators, and there are reasons to believe their approval could come much quicker than expected, possibly before the Election Day. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have provided sweeping new labor protections for workers laid off during the pandemic by requiring hotel, airport and janitorial employers to rehire based on seniority. The protections pushed by labor groups targeted businesses, including event centers and building maintenance, that have let go a third of their workforce as a result of COVID-19. Gov. Newsom said the bill was too prescriptive and threatened to hurt the already devastated hospitality industry. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The federal government will begin distributing millions of rapid coronavirus tests to states this week, with governors urged to use the kits to reopen schools for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Abbott Laboratories tests will allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low. (Associated Press)
  • Health researchers and educational experts watch Florida for cues about what works to keep students, staff and the broader community safe amid a pandemic. In August, Florida pushed to reopen schools with in-person instruction amid concerns over a possible surge in COVID-19 cases. A USA Today analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids ages 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it is college-age adults – not schoolchildren – driving the trend. (USA Today)

Latest research news

  • Younger adults have likely contributed to community transmission of COVID-19 in summer. In June 2020, across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, increases in percentage of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results among adults aged 20-39 years preceded increases among those aged  over 60 years by four to 15 days. Nationwide, the median age of COVID-19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. (Tegan K. Boehmer et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)
  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)
  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 2nd, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 34,353,480. Total deaths: 1,023,983. Total recoveries: 23,892,818.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,288,166. Total deaths: 207,867. Total recoveries: 2,860,650.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 813,687. Total deaths: 15,888.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 271371 6610 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 55394 955 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 53909 1275 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12867 152 10.4 846,006
Riverside 59488
1226
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 271371 cases across LA County, including 6610 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 34 new deaths and 1072 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12111

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 390 36,478
La Verne 474 32,206
Pomona 5585 152,361
Montclair 1286 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2927 177,751
Upland 1450 77,000

Policy

  • Drugmakers Eli Lilly and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals each released positive data for COVID-19 antibody therapeutics they are developing as treatments and passive vaccines. Both companies are discussing their data with regulators, and there are reasons to believe their approval could come much quicker than expected, possibly before the Election Day. (Bloomberg)
  • Newsom vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have provided sweeping new labor protections for workers laid off during the pandemic by requiring hotel, airport and janitorial employers to rehire based on seniority. The protections pushed by labor groups targeted businesses, including event centers and building maintenance, that have let go a third of their workforce as a result of COVID-19. Gov. Newsom said the bill was too prescriptive and threatened to hurt the already devastated hospitality industry. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The federal government will begin distributing millions of rapid coronavirus tests to states this week, with governors urged to use the kits to reopen schools for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Abbott Laboratories tests will allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low. (Associated Press)
  • House Democrats have released a $2.2 trillion coronavirus response package in an attempt to revive long-stalled aid negotiations with Republicans. The proposed legislation addresses many of Democrats’ top priorities, including reviving the expired $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit through January. Democrats also included another round of direct payments of $1,200 per person and $500 per dependent, funds for small business loans and food security programs as well as $436 billion in relief for states and local governments. (NPR)
  • Health researchers and educational experts watch Florida for cues about what works to keep students, staff and the broader community safe amid a pandemic. In August, Florida pushed to reopen schools with in-person instruction amid concerns over a possible surge in COVID-19 cases. A USA Today analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids ages 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it is college-age adults – not schoolchildren – driving the trend. (USA Today)
  • A comprehensive immunization campaign against COVID-19 needs to address liability protections for manufacturers and distributors of vaccines. Issues include legal immunity from lawsuits stemming from side effects, as well as compensation systems to pay for some of the medical expenses, lost income, and other losses that can result from adverse effects of vaccination. The global nature of the pandemic complicates issues of liability outside the United States because an act of Congress cannot determine legal procedure in other countries. (RAND)

Latest research news

  • COVID-19 can spread on airline flights. In-flight transmission that probably originated from one symptomatic passenger caused a large cluster of cases during a long flight, a study finds. Guidelines for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among air passengers should consider individual passengers’ risk for infection, the number of passengers traveling, and flight duration. (Nguyen Cong Khanh et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)
  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)
  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)
  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

October 1st, 2020

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 34,048,240. Total deaths: 1,015,429. Total recoveries: 23,687,383.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,241,449. Total deaths: 207,147. Total recoveries: 2,840,688.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 810,625. Total deaths: 15,792.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 270299 6576 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 55203 955 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 53751 1268 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12787 152 10.4 846,006
Riverside 59405
1226
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 270299 cases across LA County, including 6576 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 25 new deaths and 1015 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12076

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 388 36,478
La Verne 474 32,206
Pomona 5568 152,361
Montclair 1283 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2914 177,751
Upland 1448 77,000

Policy

  • Newsom vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have provided sweeping new labor protections for workers laid off during the pandemic by requiring hotel, airport and janitorial employers to rehire based on seniority. The protections pushed by labor groups targeted businesses, including event centers and building maintenance, that have let go a third of their workforce as a result of COVID-19. Gov. Newsom said the bill was too prescriptive and threatened to hurt the already devastated hospitality industry. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The federal government will begin distributing millions of rapid coronavirus tests to states this week, with governors urged to use the kits to reopen schools for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Abbott Laboratories tests will allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low. (Associated Press)
  • House Democrats have released a $2.2 trillion coronavirus response package in an attempt to revive long-stalled aid negotiations with Republicans. The proposed legislation addresses many of Democrats’ top priorities, including reviving the expired $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit through January. Democrats also included another round of direct payments of $1,200 per person and $500 per dependent, funds for small business loans and food security programs as well as $436 billion in relief for states and local governments. (NPR)
  • Health researchers and educational experts watch Florida for cues about what works to keep students, staff and the broader community safe amid a pandemic. In August, Florida pushed to reopen schools with in-person instruction amid concerns over a possible surge in COVID-19 cases. A USA Today analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids ages 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it is college-age adults – not schoolchildren – driving the trend. (USA Today)
  • A comprehensive immunization campaign against COVID-19 needs to address liability protections for manufacturers and distributors of vaccines. Issues include legal immunity from lawsuits stemming from side effects, as well as compensation systems to pay for some of the medical expenses, lost income, and other losses that can result from adverse effects of vaccination. The global nature of the pandemic complicates issues of liability outside the United States because an act of Congress cannot determine legal procedure in other countries. (RAND)
  • The U.S. Government Accountability Office recently updated its oversight report of federal actions to support public health, individuals, and the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings indicate that the Department of Health and Human Services may be able to collect more complete data on COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among racial and ethnic minority groups. Additionally, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS do not know how many eligible people have yet to receive an economic impact payment.

Latest research news

  • A genetic association study of 3,199 patients identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a major genetic risk locus for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization and respiratory failure. The risk is conferred by a genomic segment of ~50 kb that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50 percent of people in South Asia and about 16 percent of people in Europe today. (Hugo Zeberg and Svante Pääbo Nature)
  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)
  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)
  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)
  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 30th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 33,710,748. Total deaths: 1,009,064. Total recoveries: 23,433,614.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,192,969. Total deaths: 206,036. Total recoveries: 2,813,305.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 807,425. Total deaths: 15,640.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 269284 6551 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 54849 952 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 53557 1249 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12707 150 10.4 846,006
Riverside 59173
1216
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 269284 cases across LA County, including 6551 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 46 new deaths and 829 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 12006

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 386 36,478
La Verne 469 32,206
Pomona 5537 152,361
Montclair 1274 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2901 177,751
Upland 1438 77,000

Policy

  • The federal government will begin distributing millions of rapid coronavirus tests to states this week, with governors urged to use the kits to reopen schools for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Abbott Laboratories tests will allow parents to know whether their symptomatic child has COVID-19. In some cases, states could undertake some baseline surveillance, like testing a proportion of students per week or per month to make sure that the incidence of COVID-19 is low. (Associated Press)
  • House Democrats have released a $2.2 trillion coronavirus response package in an attempt to revive long-stalled aid negotiations with Republicans. The proposed legislation addresses many of Democrats’ top priorities, including reviving the expired $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit through January. Democrats also included another round of direct payments of $1,200 per person and $500 per dependent, funds for small business loans and food security programs as well as $436 billion in relief for states and local governments. (NPR)
  • Health researchers and educational experts watch Florida for cues about what works to keep students, staff and the broader community safe amid a pandemic. In August, Florida pushed to reopen schools with in-person instruction amid concerns over a possible surge in COVID-19 cases. A USA Today analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids ages 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it is college-age adults – not schoolchildren – driving the trend. (USA Today)
  • A comprehensive immunization campaign against COVID-19 needs to address liability protections for manufacturers and distributors of vaccines. Issues include legal immunity from lawsuits stemming from side effects, as well as compensation systems to pay for some of the medical expenses, lost income, and other losses that can result from adverse effects of vaccination. The global nature of the pandemic complicates issues of liability outside the United States because an act of Congress cannot determine legal procedure in other countries. (RAND)
  • The U.S. Government Accountability Office recently updated its oversight report of federal actions to support public health, individuals, and the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings indicate that the Department of Health and Human Services may be able to collect more complete data on COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among racial and ethnic minority groups. Additionally, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS do not know how many eligible people have yet to receive an economic impact payment.
  • San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed Thursday announced a $28.5 million COVID-related support for the Latino community, which has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. An initial funding of $22.5 million will come through various public and private sources and support testing and contact tracing, housing, food access, workforce, and small businesses.

Latest research news

  • A small study of participants 56 years of age and older shows the effectiveness of a two-dose Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in an older population. The vaccine series had an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile at doses of both 25 μg and 100 μg, with mostly mild-to-moderate local and systemic adverse events of short duration, which occurred predominantly after the second dose. (J. Anderson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)
  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)
  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)
  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)
  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 29th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 33,431,133. Total deaths: 1,003,168. Total recoveries: 23,197,023.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,152,221. Total deaths: 205,161. Total recoveries: 2,794,608.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 805,263. Total deaths: 15,608.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 268455 6515 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 54482 925 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 53448 1216 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12653 150 10.4 846,006
Riverside 58932
1206
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 268455 cases across LA County, including 6515 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 27 new deaths and 2680 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11951

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 384 36,478
La Verne 467 32,206
Pomona 5521 152,361
Montclair 1270 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2887 177,751
Upland 1422 77,000

Policy

  • House Democrats have released a $2.2 trillion coronavirus response package in an attempt to revive long-stalled aid negotiations with Republicans. The proposed legislation addresses many of Democrats’ top priorities, including reviving the expired $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit through January. Democrats also included another round of direct payments of $1,200 per person and $500 per dependent, funds for small business loans and food security programs as well as $436 billion in relief for states and local governments. (NPR)
  • Health researchers and educational experts watch Florida for cues about what works to keep students, staff and the broader community safe amid a pandemic. In August, Florida pushed to reopen schools with in-person instruction amid concerns over a possible surge in COVID-19 cases. A USA Today analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids ages 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it is college-age adults – not schoolchildren – driving the trend. (USA Today)
  • A comprehensive immunization campaign against COVID-19 needs to address liability protections for manufacturers and distributors of vaccines. Issues include legal immunity from lawsuits stemming from side effects, as well as compensation systems to pay for some of the medical expenses, lost income, and other losses that can result from adverse effects of vaccination. The global nature of the pandemic complicates issues of liability outside the United States because an act of Congress cannot determine legal procedure in other countries. (RAND)
  • The U.S. Government Accountability Office recently updated its oversight report of federal actions to support public health, individuals, and the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings indicate that the Department of Health and Human Services may be able to collect more complete data on COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among racial and ethnic minority groups. Additionally, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS do not know how many eligible people have yet to receive an economic impact payment.
  • San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed Thursday announced a $28.5 million COVID-related support for the Latino community, which has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. An initial funding of $22.5 million will come through various public and private sources and support testing and contact tracing, housing, food access, workforce, and small businesses.
  • L.A. County remains in the most restrictive level of state guidelines for waivers that would allow them to conduct in-person learning. Los Angeles Unified School District students are not expected to return to schools for in-person before November. Meanwhile, Orange County is allowed to reopen schools Tuesday, per state guidelines, as the county has gone 14 days without exceeding seven new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. School districts have decided to push their start dates back, with some planning a phased return with a hybrid online and in-person format to allow for physical distancing. (ABC News)

Latest research news

  • Analysis of plasma of 28,503 randomly selected adult patients receiving dialysis showed that fewer than 10 percent of the adult population in the United States formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 as of July 2020, and that herd immunity remains out of reach. (Shuchi Anand et al. The Lancet)
  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)
  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)
  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)
  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)
  • Patients with a recent diagnosis of substance use disorders are found to be at significantly increased risk for COVID-19, an effect that is strongest for individuals with opioid use disorders, followed by individuals with tobacco use disorder. COVID-19 patients with substance use disorders have significantly worse outcomes (death: 9.6 percent hospitalization: 41 percent) than general COVID-19 patients (death: 6.6 percent, hospitalization: 30.1 percent). African Americans with COVID-19 and substance use disorders experience worse outcomes (death: 13 percent, hospitalization: 50.7 percent) than Caucasians (death: 8.6 percent, hospitalization: 35.2 percent). (Quan Qiu Wang et al. Molecular Psychiatry)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 28th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 33,137,748. Total deaths: 998,372. Total recoveries: 24,638,480.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,139,301. Total deaths: 204,597. Total recoveries: 4,571,236.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 811,698. Total deaths: 15,608.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 265775 6488 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 53669 922 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 52904 1204 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12488 150 10.4 846,006
Riverside 58178
1189
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 265775 cases across LA County, including 6488 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 33 new deaths and 1361 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11797

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 384 36,478
La Verne 465 32,206
Pomona 5454 152,361
Montclair 1255 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2835 177,751
Upland 1404 77,000

Policy

  • A comprehensive immunization campaign against COVID-19 needs to address liability protections for manufacturers and distributors of vaccines. Issues include legal immunity from lawsuits stemming from side effects, as well as over compensation systems to pay for some of the medical expenses, lost income, and other losses that can result from adverse effects of vaccination. The global nature of the pandemic complicates issues of liability outside the United States because an act of Congress cannot determine legal procedure in other countries. (RAND)
  • The U.S. Government Accountability Office recently updated its oversight report of federal actions to support public health, individuals, and the economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings indicate that the Department of Health and Human Services may be able to collect more complete data on COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths among racial and ethnic minority groups. Additionally, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS do not know how many eligible people have yet to receive an economic impact payment.
  • San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed Thursday announced a $28.5 million COVID-related support for the Latino community, which has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. An initial funding of $22.5 million will come through various public and private sources and support testing and contact tracing, housing, food access, workforce, and small businesses.
  • A. County remains in the most restrictive level of state guidelines for waivers that would allow them to conduct in-person learning. Los Angeles Unified School District students are not expected to return to schools for in-person before November. Meanwhile, Orange County is allowed to reopen schools Tuesday, per state guidelines, as the county has gone 14 days without exceeding seven new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. School districts have decided to push their start dates back, with some planning a phased return with a hybrid online and in-person format to allow for physical distancing. (ABC News)
  • Many American parents are hesitant to give their kids a COVID-19 vaccine as it becomes available. What if schools require it? While all 50 states require student vaccinations, a patchwork of laws allows for parental objections, including exemptions based on medical and non-medical reasons. Meanwhile, the public health response necessitates efforts to maximize the number of children who receive the vaccine, which will, in turn, help build herd immunity for those kids who are not or cannot be vaccinated. (NBC News)
  • To boost trust and transparency, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to adopt more stringent standards for emergency authorization of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The new standards will require vaccine manufactures to follow participants in late-stage clinical trials for a median of at least two months, starting after they receive a second vaccine shot. The FDA is also looking for at least five severe cases of COVID-19 in the placebo group for each trial, as well as some cases of the disease in older people. The agency has previously said any vaccine would have to be 50 percent more effective than a placebo. (The Washington Post

Latest research news

  • A study shows that the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44 percent of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52 percent after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test. The seroprevalence fell in July and August due to antibody waning. After correcting for this, the study estimates a final epidemic size of 66 percent, suggesting that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic. (Lewis Buss et al. medRxiv)
  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)
  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)
  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)
  • Patients with a recent diagnosis of substance use disorders are found to be at significantly increased risk for COVID-19, an effect that is strongest for individuals with opioid use disorders, followed by individuals with tobacco use disorder. COVID-19 patients with substance use disorders have significantly worse outcomes (death: 9.6 percent hospitalization: 41 percent) than general COVID-19 patients (death: 6.6 percent, hospitalization: 30.1 percent). African Americans with COVID-19 and substance use disorders experience worse outcomes (death: 13 percent, hospitalization: 50.7 percent) than Caucasians (death: 8.6 percent, hospitalization: 35.2 percent). (Quan Qiu Wang et al. Molecular Psychiatry)
  • A study of genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 suggests a possible in-flight transmission of coronavirus during long-distance air travel. Four people positive for COVID-19 travelling from the U.S. to Hong Kong had unique genetic sequences, belonging to a clade not previously identified in Hong Kong. (Edward M. Choi et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 25th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 32,284,038. Total deaths: 983,952. Total recoveries: 22,015,638.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 7,004,670. Total deaths: 202,707. Total recoveries: 2,670,256.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 801,671. Total deaths: 15,389.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 264414 6455 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 53359 908 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 54023 1182 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12591 147 10.4 846,006
Riverside 57883
1179
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 264414 cases across LA County, including 6455 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 32 new deaths and 1081 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11714

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 383 36,478
La Verne 464 32,206
Pomona 5419 152,361
Montclair 1245 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2810 177,751
Upland 1393 77,000

Policy

  • San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed Thursday announced a $28.5 million COVID-related support for the Latino community, which has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. An initial funding of $22.5 million will come through various public and private sources and support testing and contact tracing, housing, food access, workforce, and small businesses.
  • A. County remains in the most restrictive level of state guidelines for waivers that would allow them to conduct in-person learning. Los Angeles Unified School District students are not expected to return to schools for in-person before November. Meanwhile, Orange County is allowed to reopen schools Tuesday, per state guidelines, as the county has gone 14 days without exceeding seven new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. School districts have decided to push their start dates back, with some planning a phased return with a hybrid online and in-person format to allow for physical distancing. (ABC News)
  • Many American parents are hesitant to give their kids a COVID-19 vaccine as it becomes available. What if schools require it? While all 50 states require student vaccinations, a patchwork of laws allows for parental objections, including exemptions based on medical and non-medical reasons. Meanwhile, the public health response necessitates efforts to maximize the number of children who receive the vaccine, which will, in turn, help build herd immunity for those kids who are not or cannot be vaccinated. (NBC News)
  • To boost trust and transparency, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to adopt more stringent standards for emergency authorization of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The new standards will require vaccine manufactures to follow participants in late-stage clinical trials for a median of at least two months, starting after they receive a second vaccine shot. The FDA is also looking for at least five severe cases of COVID-19 in the placebo group for each trial, as well as some cases of the disease in older people. The agency has previously said any vaccine would have to be 50 percent more effective than a placebo. (The Washington Post)
  • Resurgent COVID-19 cases in the United States are driven by adults aged 20-49, accounting for almost 63 percent of infections. Working adults who need to support themselves and their families are most likely a main driving force of epidemics in the United States. Re-opening kindergartens and elementary schools is essential but are predicted to facilitate the spread of SARS-Cov-2 in areas with sustained community-wide transmission from adults. (Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team medRxiv)
  • The CDC over the weekend posted and then retracted coronavirus guidelines that said the virus might be spread by airborne transmission over a distance beyond six feet, and that indoor environments without good ventilation increase the risk. The retraction raised questions of possible political pressure or apolitical technical error. (CNN) Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious disease, said Monday the initial update was posted in error, and without any technical review, according to the Washington Post.

Latest research news

  • London is to host the world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with coronavirus to assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines. The trials will play a vital role in narrowing the large field of promising COVID-19 vaccines likely to move into clinical testing early next year. Volunteers will be inoculated with a vaccine and a month or so later receive a “challenge” dose of SARS-COV-2 under controlled conditions. (Financial Times)
  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)
  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)
  • Patients with a recent diagnosis of substance use disorders are found to be at significantly increased risk for COVID-19, an effect that is strongest for individuals with opioid use disorders, followed by individuals with tobacco use disorder. COVID-19 patients with substance use disorders have significantly worse outcomes (death: 9.6 percent hospitalization: 41 percent) than general COVID-19 patients (death: 6.6 percent, hospitalization: 30.1 percent). African Americans with COVID-19 and substance use disorders experience worse outcomes (death: 13 percent, hospitalization: 50.7 percent) than Caucasians (death: 8.6 percent, hospitalization: 35.2 percent). (Quan Qiu Wang et al. Molecular Psychiatry)
  • A study of genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 suggests a possible in-flight transmission of coronavirus during long-distance air travel. Four people positive for COVID-19 travelling from the U.S. to Hong Kong had unique genetic sequences, belonging to a clade not previously identified in Hong Kong. (Edward M. Choi et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A study of the potential health impacts of K-12 school reopening found that between 42 and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19. The study also found that many school employees and many school-age children lived in households with persons with increased risk. Overall, between 63.2 and 71.9 percent of school employees and between 58.7 and 71 percent of school-age children lived in households with at least one increased-risk adult. (Thomas M. Selden et al. Health Affairs)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 24th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 31,944,038. Total deaths: 977,881. Total recoveries: 22,015,638.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,941,248. Total deaths: 202,170. Total recoveries: 2,670,256.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 787,470. Total deaths: 15,204.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 263333 6423 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 53121 908 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 52538 1176 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12385 146 10.4 846,006
Riverside 57695
1172
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 263333 cases across LA County, including 6423 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 22 new deaths and 1200 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11650

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 381 36,478
La Verne 462 32,206
Pomona 5395 152,361
Montclair 1238 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2788 177,751
Upland 1386 77,000

Policy

  • A. County remains in the most restrictive level of state guidelines for waivers that would allow them to conduct in-person learning. Los Angeles Unified School District students are not expected to return to schools for in-person before November. Meanwhile, Orange County is allowed to reopen schools Tuesday, per state guidelines, as the county has gone 14 days without exceeding seven new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. School districts have decided to push their start dates back, with some planning a phased return with a hybrid online and in-person format to allow for physical distancing. (ABC News)
  • Many American parents are hesitant to give their kids a COVID-19 vaccine as it becomes available. What if schools require it? While all 50 states require student vaccinations, a patchwork of laws allows for parental objections, including exemptions based on medical and non-medical reasons. Meanwhile, the public health response necessitates efforts to maximize the number of children who receive the vaccine, which will, in turn, help build herd immunity for those kids who are not or cannot be vaccinated. (NBC News)
  • To boost trust and transparency, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to adopt more stringent standards for emergency authorization of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The new standards will require vaccine manufactures to follow participants in late-stage clinical trials for a median of at least two months, starting after they receive a second vaccine shot. The FDA is also looking for at least five severe cases of COVID-19 in the placebo group for each trial, as well as some cases of the disease in older people. The agency has previously said any vaccine would have to be 50 percent more effective than a placebo. (The Washington Post)
  • Resurgent COVID-19 cases in the United States are driven by adults aged 20-49, accounting for almost 63 percent of infections. Working adults who need to support themselves and their families are most likely a main driving force of epidemics in the United States. Re-opening kindergartens and elementary schools is essential but are predicted to facilitate the spread of SARS-Cov-2 in areas with sustained community-wide transmission from adults. (Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team medRxiv)
  • The CDC over the weekend posted and then retracted coronavirus guidelines that said the virus might be spread by airborne transmission over a distance beyond six feet, and that indoor environments without good ventilation increase the risk. The retraction raised questions of possible political pressure or apolitical technical error. (CNN) Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious disease, said Monday the initial update was posted in error, and without any technical review, according to the Washington Post.
  • Fiscal policies enacted by the federal government in response to the coronavirus pandemic will add $2.3 trillion to the deficit in fiscal year 2020 and $600 billion in 2021. By providing financial support to households, businesses, and state and local governments, the legislation will offset part of the deterioration in economic conditions brought about by the pandemic. The adopted legislation will boost the level of real (inflation-adjusted) GDP by 4.7 percent in 2020 and 3.1 percent in 2021. In the short term, for every dollar that it adds to the deficit, the legislation is projected to increase GDP by about 59 cents. In the longer term, the legislation will reduce the level of real GDP. (Congressional Budget Office)

Latest research news

  • Johnson & Johnson said Wednesday it started a 60,000-person clinical trial of its single-dose COVID-19 vaccine on three continents, becoming the fourth experimental COVID-19 shot to enter final-stage testing in the United States. (Wall Street Journal)
  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)
  • Patients with a recent diagnosis of substance use disorders are found to be at significantly increased risk for COVID-19, an effect that is strongest for individuals with opioid use disorders, followed by individuals with tobacco use disorder. COVID-19 patients with substance use disorders have significantly worse outcomes (death: 9.6 percent hospitalization: 41 percent) than general COVID-19 patients (death: 6.6 percent, hospitalization: 30.1 percent). African Americans with COVID-19 and substance use disorders experience worse outcomes (death: 13 percent, hospitalization: 50.7 percent) than Caucasians (death: 8.6 percent, hospitalization: 35.2 percent). (Quan Qiu Wang et al. Molecular Psychiatry)
  • A study of genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 suggests a possible in-flight transmission of coronavirus during long-distance air travel. Four people positive for COVID-19 travelling from the U.S. to Hong Kong had unique genetic sequences, belonging to a clade not previously identified in Hong Kong. (Edward M. Choi et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A study of the potential health impacts of K-12 school reopening found that between 42 and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19. The study also found that many school employees and many school-age children lived in households with persons with increased risk. Overall, between 63.2 and 71.9 percent of school employees and between 58.7 and 71 percent of school-age children lived in households with at least one increased-risk adult. (Thomas M. Selden et al. Health Affairs)
  • Southern Hemisphere countries are reporting little influenza activity, likely due to widespread adoption of community mitigation measures to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In the United States, the percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza has decreased from above 20 percent to 2.3 percent and remains at historically low inter-seasonal levels (0.2 percent vs. 1-2 percent). (Sonja J. Olsen et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 23rd

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 31,673,086. Total deaths: 972,100. Total recoveries: 21,785,468.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,902,930. Total deaths: 201,120. Total recoveries: 2,646,959.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 784,324. Total deaths: 15,071.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 262133 6401 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 52873 908 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 52382 1150 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12275 146 10.4 846,006
Riverside 57482
1172
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 262133 cases across LA County, including 6401 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 35 new deaths and 687 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11589

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 379 36,478
La Verne 460 32,206
Pomona 5371 152,361
Montclair 1228 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2772 177,751
Upland 1379 77,000

Policy

  • To boost trust and transparency, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to adopt more stringent standards for emergency authorization of a future COVID-19 vaccine. The new standards will require vaccine manufactures to follow participants in late-stage clinical trials for a median of at least two months, starting after they receive a second vaccine shot. The FDA is also looking for at least five severe cases of COVID-19 in the placebo group for each trial, as well as some cases of the disease in older people. The agency has previously said any vaccine would have to be 50 percent more effective than a placebo. (The Washington Post)
  • Resurgent COVID-19 cases in the United States are driven by adults aged 20-49, accounting for almost 63 percent of infections. Working adults who need to support themselves and their families are most likely a main driving force of epidemics in the United States. Re-opening kindergartens and elementary schools is essential but are predicted to facilitate the spread of SARS-Cov-2 in areas with sustained community-wide transmission from adults. (Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team medRxiv)
  • The CDC over the weekend posted and then retracted coronavirus guidelines that said the virus might be spread by airborne transmission over a distance beyond six feet, and that indoor environments without good ventilation increase the risk. The retraction raised questions of possible political pressure or apolitical technical error. (CNN) Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious disease, said Monday the initial update was posted in error, and without any technical review, according to the Washington Post.
  • Fiscal policies enacted by the federal government in response to the coronavirus pandemic will add $2.3 trillion to the deficit in fiscal year 2020 and $600 billion in 2021. By providing financial support to households, businesses, and state and local governments, the legislation will offset part of the deterioration in economic conditions brought about by the pandemic. The adopted legislation will boost the level of real (inflation-adjusted) GDP by 4.7 percent in 2020 and 3.1 percent in 2021. In the short term, for every dollar that it adds to the deficit, the legislation is projected to increase GDP by about 59 cents. In the longer term, the legislation will reduce the level of real GDP. (Congressional Budget Office)
  • Few Americans say they would accept vaccination against the coronavirus, according to Pew Research Center polling that shows acceptance has declined from 72 percent in May to 51 percent now. The share who would definitely get a coronavirus vaccine now stands at just 21 percent, which is half the share of four months ago. Only 19 percent of the public has great confidence that the research and development process in the U.S. will produce a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19. (Pew Research Center)
  • California Gov. Newsom signed two bills Thursday as part of worker protection package. The first bill (SB 1159) expands access to workers’ compensation and makes it easier for first responders, health care workers and people who test positive for COVID-19 due to an outbreak at work to get medical care and wage replacement benefits. The second bill (AB 685) ensures timely notification to employees as well as local and state public health officials of COVID-19 cases at work. This notification will help workers take necessary precautions such as seeking testing, getting medical help or complying with quarantine directives.

Latest research news

  • A study estimating the COVID-19 infection risk for different indoor environments such as an office, a classroom, a choir practice room and reception/party environments suggests that aerosols from highly infective subjects can effectively transmit COVID-19 in indoor environments. Active room ventilation and the ubiquitous wearing of face masks may reduce the individual infection risk by a factor of five to ten, similar to high-volume HEPA air filtering. ( Lelieveld et al. medRxiv)
  • Patients with a recent diagnosis of substance use disorders are found to be at significantly increased risk for COVID-19, an effect that is strongest for individuals with opioid use disorders, followed by individuals with tobacco use disorder. COVID-19 patients with substance use disorders have significantly worse outcomes (death: 9.6 percent hospitalization: 41 percent) than general COVID-19 patients (death: 6.6 percent, hospitalization: 30.1 percent). African Americans with COVID-19 and substance use disorders experience worse outcomes (death: 13 percent, hospitalization: 50.7 percent) than Caucasians (death: 8.6 percent, hospitalization: 35.2 percent). (Quan Qiu Wang et al. Molecular Psychiatry)
  • A study of genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 suggests a possible in-flight transmission of coronavirus during long-distance air travel. Four people positive for COVID-19 travelling from the U.S. to Hong Kong had unique genetic sequences, belonging to a clade not previously identified in Hong Kong. (Edward M. Choi et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A study of the potential health impacts of K-12 school reopening found that between 42 and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19. The study also found that many school employees and many school-age children lived in households with persons with increased risk. Overall, between 63.2 and 71.9 percent of school employees and between 58.7 and 71 percent of school-age children lived in households with at least one increased-risk adult. (Thomas M. Selden et al. Health Affairs)
  • Southern Hemisphere countries are reporting little influenza activity, likely due to widespread adoption of community mitigation measures to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In the United States, the percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza has decreased from above 20 percent to 2.3 percent and remains at historically low inter-seasonal levels (0.2 percent vs. 1-2 percent). (Sonja J. Olsen et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • Data from a study of over one million participants shows that blood group O plays a protective role against COVID-19 infection, in contrast to non-O blood groups. Additionally, genes that code for a person’s blood type are found to be linked to whether a person would test positive for COVID-19. A section of chromosome 3 – referred to as chr3p21.31 – is linked to COVID-19 severity. (STAT)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 22nd

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 31,361,979. Total deaths: 965,642. Total recoveries: 21,528,674.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,880,635. Total deaths: 199,789. Total recoveries: 3,747,380.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 792,217. Total deaths: 15,069.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 261446 6366 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 52649 908 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 52201 1128 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 12234 146 10.4 846,006
Riverside 57419
1162
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 261446 cases across LA County, including 6366 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 36 new deaths and 2930 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11542

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 379 36,478
La Verne 458 32,206
Pomona 5356 152,361
Montclair 1221 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2761 177,751
Upland 1373 77,000

Policy

  • The CDC over the weekend posted and then retracted coronavirus guidelines that said the virus might be spread by airborne transmission over a distance beyond six feet, and that indoor environments without good ventilation increase the risk. The retraction raised questions of possible political pressure or apolitical technical error. (CNN) Jay Butler, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious disease, said Monday the initial update was posted in error, and without any technical review, according to the Washington Post.
  • Fiscal policies enacted by the federal government in response to the coronavirus pandemic will add $2.3 trillion to the deficit in fiscal year 2020 and $600 billion in 2021. By providing financial support to households, businesses, and state and local governments, the legislation will offset part of the deterioration in economic conditions brought about by the pandemic. The adopted legislation will boost the level of real (inflation-adjusted) GDP by 4.7 percent in 2020 and 3.1 percent in 2021. In the short term, for every dollar that it adds to the deficit, the legislation is projected to increase GDP by about 59 cents. In the longer term, the legislation will reduce the level of real GDP. (Congressional Budget Office)
  • Few Americans say they would accept vaccination against the coronavirus, according to Pew Research Center polling that shows acceptance has declined from 72 percent in May to 51 percent now. The share who would definitely get a coronavirus vaccine now stands at just 21 percent, which is half the share of four months ago. Only 19 percent of the public has great confidence that the research and development process in the U.S. will produce a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19. (Pew Research Center)
  • California Newsom signed two bills Thursday as part of worker protection package. The first bill (SB 1159) expands access to workers’ compensation and makes it easier for first responders, health care workers and people who test positive for COVID-19 due to an outbreak at work to get medical care and wage replacement benefits. The second bill (AB 685) ensures timely notification to employees as well as local and state public health officials of COVID-19 cases at work. This notification will help workers take necessary precautions such as seeking testing, getting medical help or complying with quarantine directives.
  • A COVID-19 vaccine will likely be available to the American public late second quarter or third quarter of 2021, CDC official told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday. A vaccine is expected between November and December, but distribution will be limited and prioritized to first responders and those at greatest risk for death. (CNN)
  • The 2020 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers report paints a bleak picture of the far-ranging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, projecting global losses of $12 trillion by the end of 2021. The report points to vaccine coverage as a proxy for the effectiveness of health system functioning and estimates that in 2020 vaccination coverage is at levels last seen in the 1990s. (STAT)

Latest research news

  • A study of genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 suggests a possible in-flight transmission of coronavirus during long-distance air travel. Four people positive for COVID-19 travelling from the U.S. to Hong Kong had unique genetic sequences, belonging to a clade not previously identified in Hong Kong. (Edward M. Choi et al. CDC Emerging Infectious Diseases)
  • A study of the potential health impacts of K-12 school reopening found that between 42 and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19. The study also found that many school employees and many school-age children lived in households with persons with increased risk. Overall, between 63.2 and 71.9 percent of school employees and between 58.7 and 71 percent of school-age children lived in households with at least one increased-risk adult. (Thomas M. Selden et al. Health Affairs)
  • Southern Hemisphere countries are reporting little influenza activity, likely due to widespread adoption of community mitigation measures to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In the United States, the percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza has decreased from above 20 percent to 2.3 percent and remains at historically low inter-seasonal levels (0.2 percent vs. 1-2 percent). (Sonja J. Olsen et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • Data from a study of over one million participants shows that blood group O plays a protective role against COVID-19 infection, in contrast to non-O blood groups. Additionally, genes that code for a person’s blood type are found to be linked to whether a person would test positive for COVID-19. A section of chromosome 3 – referred to as chr3p21.31 – is linked to COVID-19 severity. (STAT)
  • A study finds that out of 121 SARS-CoV-2-associated deaths among persons aged 21 years and younger, minorities such as Hispanic, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native persons account for 94 (78 percent) of these deaths. Among the deceased, 75 percent had an underlying medical condition and 65 percent died after admission to a hospital. (Danae Bixler et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 21st

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 31,103,347. Total deaths: 961,435. Total recoveries: 21,281,441.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,825,761. Total deaths: 199,361. Total recoveries: 3,705,509.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 788,077. Total deaths: 15,018.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 258516 6330 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 51750 858 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 51646 1123 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11969 143 10.4 846,006
Riverside 56681
1153
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 258516 cases across LA County, including 6330 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 6 new deaths and 2245 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11356

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 369 36,478
La Verne 447 32,206
Pomona 5290 152,361
Montclair 1193 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2707 177,751
Upland 1350 77,000

Policy

  • Few Americans say they would accept vaccination against the coronavirus, according to Pew Research Center polling that shows acceptance has declined from 72 percent in May to 51 percent now. The share who would definitely get a coronavirus vaccine now stands at just 21 percent, which is half the share of four months ago. Only 19 percent of the public has great confidence that the research and development process in the U.S. will produce a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19. (Pew Research Center)
  • California Newsom signed two bills Thursday as part of worker protection package. The first bill (SB 1159) expands access to workers’ compensation and makes it easier for first responders, health care workers and people who test positive for COVID-19 due to an outbreak at work to get medical care and wage replacement benefits. The second bill (AB 685) ensures timely notification to employees as well as local and state public health officials of COVID-19 cases at work. This notification will help workers take necessary precautions such as seeking testing, getting medical help or complying with quarantine directives.
  • A COVID-19 vaccine will likely be available to the American public late second quarter or third quarter of 2021, CDC official told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday. A vaccine is expected between November and December, but distribution will be limited and prioritized to first responders and those at greatest risk for death. (CNN)
  • The 2020 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers report paints a bleak picture of the far-ranging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, projecting global losses of $12 trillion by the end of 2021. The report points to vaccine coverage as a proxy for the effectiveness of health system functioning and estimates that in 2020 vaccination coverage is at levels last seen in the 1990s. (STAT)
  • New York city is planning for a second wave of coronavirus cases while weighing options to get people back to their regular lives. Modeling experts at Columbia and NYU suggest the city is likely to see a significant increase in cases this fall, but there is an opportunity to stop the worst with careful public-health measures like masks and social distancing. (Bloomberg)
  • Wildfire-struck California is experiencing some of the worst air quality in the world. Poor air quality can worsen patient outcomes from COVID-19. A confluence of environmental and public health crises raises the urgency for improving air standards and other environmental protections. (NBC)

Latest research news

  • A study of the potential health impacts of K-12 school reopening found that between 42 and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19. The study also found that many school employees and many school-age children lived in households with persons with increased risk. Overall, between 63.2 and 71.9 percent of school employees and between 58.7 and 71 percent of school-age children lived in households with at least one increased-risk adult. (Thomas M. Selden et al. Health Affairs)
  • Southern Hemisphere countries are reporting little influenza activity, likely due to widespread adoption of community mitigation measures to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In the United States, the percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza has decreased from above 20 percent to 2.3 percent and remains at historically low inter-seasonal levels (0.2 percent vs. 1-2 percent). (Sonja J. Olsen et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • Data from a study of over one million participants shows that blood group O plays a protective role against COVID-19 infection, in contrast to non-O blood groups. Additionally, genes that code for a person’s blood type are found to be linked to whether a person would test positive for COVID-19. A section of chromosome 3 – referred to as chr3p21.31 – is linked to COVID-19 severity. (STAT)
  • A study finds that out of 121 SARS-CoV-2-associated deaths among persons aged 21 years and younger, minorities such as Hispanic, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native persons account for 94 (78 percent) of these deaths. Among the deceased, 75 percent had an underlying medical condition and 65 percent died after admission to a hospital. (Danae Bixler et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)
  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 18th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 30,221,414. Total deaths: 946,963. Total recoveries: 20,568,133.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,698,762. Total deaths: 197,529. Total recoveries: 3,657,504.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 776,944. Total deaths: 14,807.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 257271 6324 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 51467 839 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 51399 1115 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11929 142 10.4 846,006
Riverside 56374
1143
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 256271 cases across LA County, including 6324 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 21 new deaths and 1123 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11304

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 367 36,478
La Verne 445 32,206
Pomona 5270 152,361
Montclair 1182 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2695 177,751
Upland 1345 77,000

Policy

  • California Newsom signed two bills Thursday as part of worker protection package. The first bill (SB 1159) expands access to workers’ compensation and makes it easier for first responders, health care workers and people who test positive for COVID-19 due to an outbreak at work to get medical care and wage replacement benefits. The second bill (AB 685) ensures timely notification to employees as well as local and state public health officials of COVID-19 cases at work. This notification will help workers take necessary precautions such as seeking testing, getting medical help or complying with quarantine directives.
  • A COVID-19 vaccine will likely be available to the American public late second quarter or third quarter of 2021, CDC official told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday. A vaccine is expected between November and December, but distribution will be limited and prioritized to first responders and those at greatest risk for death. (CNN)
  • The 2020 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers report paints a bleak picture of the far-ranging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, projecting global losses of $12 trillion by the end of 2021. The report points to vaccine coverage as a proxy for the effectiveness of health system functioning and estimates that in 2020 vaccination coverage is at levels last seen in the 1990s. (STAT)
  • New York city is planning for a second wave of coronavirus cases while weighing options to get people back to their regular lives. Modeling experts at Columbia and NYU suggest the city is likely to see a significant increase in cases this fall, but there is an opportunity to stop the worst with careful public-health measures like masks and social distancing. (Bloomberg)
  • Wildfire-struck California is experiencing some of the worst air quality in the world. Poor air quality can worsen patient outcomes from COVID-19. A confluence of environmental and public health crises raises the urgency for improving air standards and other environmental protections. (NBC)
  • Phase 3 of Oxford University/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine effort has been paused after one participant in Britain showed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. Obstacles like this one are not unexpected in vaccine development. That AstraZeneca is pausing trials to investigate signals that drug companies are taking safety seriously and staying out of pandemic politics. (Politico)

Latest research news

  • Southern Hemisphere countries are reporting little influenza activity, likely due to widespread adoption of community mitigation measures to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In the United States, the percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza has decreased from above 20 percent to 2.3 percent and remains at historically low inter-seasonal levels (0.2 percent vs. 1-2 percent). (Sonja J. Olsen et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • Data from a study of over one million participants shows that blood group O plays a protective role against COVID-19 infection, in contrast to non-O blood groups. Additionally, genes that code for a person’s blood type are found to be linked to whether a person would test positive for COVID-19. A section of chromosome 3 – referred to as chr3p21.31 – is linked to COVID-19 severity. (STAT)
  • A study finds that out of 121 SARS-CoV-2-associated deaths among persons aged 21 years and younger, minorities such as Hispanic, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native persons account for 94 (78 percent) of these deaths. Among the deceased, 75 percent had an underlying medical condition and 65 percent died after admission to a hospital. (Danae Bixler et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)
  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)
  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 17th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 29,917,428. Total deaths: 941,862. Total recoveries: 20,353,864.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,635,467. Total deaths: 196,912. Total recoveries: 2,525,573.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 762,963. Total deaths: 14,615.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 256148 6303 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 51252 838 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 51259 1111 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11842 141 10.4 846,006
Riverside 56201
1136
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 256148 cases across LA County, including 6303 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 30 new deaths and 1099 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11238

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 365 36,478
La Verne 442 32,206
Pomona 5255 152,361
Montclair 1172 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2668 177,751
Upland 1336 77,000

Policy

  • A COVID-19 vaccine will likely be available to the American public late second quarter or third quarter of 2021, CDC official told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday. A vaccine is expected between November and December, but distribution will be limited and prioritized to first responders and those at greatest risk for death. (CNN)
  • The 2020 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers report paints a bleak picture of the far-ranging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, projecting global losses of $12 trillion by the end of 2021. The report points to vaccine coverage as a proxy for the effectiveness of health system functioning and estimates that in 2020 vaccination coverage is at levels last seen in the 1990s. (STAT)
  • New York city is planning for a second wave of coronavirus cases while weighing options to get people back to their regular lives. Modeling experts at Columbia and NYU suggest the city is likely to see a significant increase in cases this fall, but there is an opportunity to stop the worst with careful public-health measures like masks and social distancing. (Bloomberg)
  • Wildfire-struck California is experiencing some of the worst air quality in the world. Poor air quality can worsen patient outcomes from COVID-19. A confluence of environmental and public health crises raises the urgency for improving air standards and other environmental protections. (NBC)
  • Phase 3 of Oxford University/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine effort has been paused after one participant in Britain showed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. Obstacles like this one are not unexpected in vaccine development. That AstraZeneca is pausing trials to investigate signals that drug companies are taking safety seriously and staying out of pandemic politics. (Politico)
  • California is working to increase voting by mail in a bid to offset COVID-19 health risks of in-person voting. The 2016 California Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to mail every registered voter a ballot one month before an election. Of 15 counties polling in the 2018 and 2020 primaries, overall voter turnout was higher while groups such as foreign-language speakers and young voters saw declines. Outreach by trusted messengers may help in targeting low-turnout groups. (Public Policy Institute of California)

Latest research news

  • Data from a study of over one million participants shows that blood group O plays a protective role against COVID-19 infection, in contrast to non-O blood groups. Additionally, genes that code for a person’s blood type are found to be linked to whether a person would test positive for COVID-19. A section of chromosome 3 – referred to as chr3p21.31 – is linked to COVID-19 severity. (STAT)
  • A study finds that out of 121 SARS-CoV-2-associated deaths among persons aged 21 years and younger, minorities such as Hispanic, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native persons account for 94 (78 percent) of these deaths. Among the deceased, 75 percent had an underlying medical condition and 65 percent died after admission to a hospital. (Danae Bixler et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)
  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)
  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 16th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 29,624,865. Total deaths: 936,313. Total recoveries: 20,129,145.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,609,770. Total deaths: 196,023. Total recoveries: 2,495,127.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 760,013. Total deaths: 14,451.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 255049 6273 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 50978 832 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 51124 1105 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11693 138 10.4 846,006
Riverside 55986
1125
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 255049 cases across LA County, including 6273 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 42 new deaths and 393 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11192

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 363 36,478
La Verne 442 32,206
Pomona 5235 152,361
Montclair 1164 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2656 177,751
Upland 1329 77,000

Policy

  • Wildfire-struck California is experiencing some of the worst air quality in the world. Poor air quality can worsen patient outcomes from COVID-19. A confluence of environmental and public health crises raises the urgency for improving air standards and other environmental protections. (NBC)
  • Phase 3 of Oxford University/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine effort has been paused after one participant in Britain showed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. Obstacles like this one are not unexpected in vaccine development. That AstraZeneca is pausing trials to investigate signals that drug companies are taking safety seriously and staying out of pandemic politics. (Politico)
  • California is working to increase voting by mail in a bid to offset COVID-19 health risks of in-person voting. The 2016 California Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to mail every registered voter a ballot one month before an election. Of 15 counties polling in the 2018 and 2020 primaries, overall voter turnout was higher while groups such as foreign-language speakers and young voters saw declines. Outreach by trusted messengers may help in targeting low-turnout groups. (Public Policy Institute of California)
  • With the Senate poised to vote Thursday on a slender GOP coronavirus relief bill, chances for a bipartisan deal on new economic stimulus look remote. Congressional impasse has prompted the White House to consider a new round of executive actions bolstering unemployment benefits, more funding for school vouchers and supporting the airline industry. (The Washington Post)
  • Los Angeles city and county are partnering with Citizen and its contact tracing mobile app SafePass. SafePass will allow users to self-report their symptoms and test results for COVID-19 and receive notifications about possible exposure. All contact tracing data is anonymous, private, encrypted, and deleted after 30 days by Citizen.
  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)

Latest research news

  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)
  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)
  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)
  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 15th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 29,323,247. Total deaths: 929,444. Total recoveries: 19,898,806.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,557,802. Total deaths: 194,674. Total recoveries: 2,474,570.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 757,778. Total deaths: 14,385.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 254656 6231 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 50709 832 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 50974 1093 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11683 135 10.4 846,006
Riverside 55766
1118
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 254656 cases across LA County, including 6231 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 60 new deaths and 2610 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11159

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 363 36,478
La Verne 442 32,206
Pomona 5233 152,361
Montclair 1161 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2638 177,751
Upland 1322 77,000

Policy

  • Wildfire-struck California is experiencing some of the worst air quality in the world. Poor air quality can worsen patient outcomes from COVID-19. A confluence of environmental and public health crises raises the urgency for improving air standards and other environmental protections. (NBC)
  • Phase 3 of Oxford University/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine effort has been paused after one participant in Britain showed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. Obstacles like this one are not unexpected in vaccine development. That AstraZeneca is pausing trials to investigate signals that drug companies are taking safety seriously and staying out of pandemic politics. (Politico)
  • California is working to increase voting by mail in a bid to offset COVID-19 health risks of in-person voting. The 2016 California Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to mail every registered voter a ballot one month before an election. Of 15 counties polling in the 2018 and 2020 primaries, overall voter turnout was higher while groups such as foreign-language speakers and young voters saw declines. Outreach by trusted messengers may help in targeting low-turnout groups. (Public Policy Institute of California)
  • With the Senate poised to vote Thursday on a slender GOP coronavirus relief bill, chances for a bipartisan deal on new economic stimulus look remote. Congressional impasse has prompted the White House to consider a new round of executive actions bolstering unemployment benefits, more funding for school vouchers and supporting the airline industry. (The Washington Post)
  • Los Angeles city and county are partnering with Citizen and its contact tracing mobile app SafePass. SafePass will allow users to self-report their symptoms and test results for COVID-19 and receive notifications about possible exposure. All contact tracing data is anonymous, private, encrypted, and deleted after 30 days by Citizen.
  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)

Latest research news

  • A study of electronic health records from a large U.S. health system with 2.5 million patient encounters annually finds that community spread of SARS-CoV-2 started in late December 2019, prior to established clinical awareness and testing. (Joann Elmore et al. Journal of Medical Internet Research)
  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)
  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)
  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 14th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 29,053,724. Total deaths: 924,953. Total recoveries: 19,652,377.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,521,887. Total deaths: 194,107. Total recoveries: 2,451,406.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 754,923. Total deaths: 14,329.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 252066 6171 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 50385 800 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 50613 1081 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11482 129 10.4 846,006
Riverside 55073
1103
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 252066 cases across LA County, including 6171 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 43 new deaths and 1042 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11080

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 361 36,478
La Verne 435 32,206
Pomona 5196 152,361
Montclair 1151 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2624 177,751
Upland 1313 77,000

Policy

  • Phase 3 of Oxford University/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine effort has been paused after one participant in Britain showed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, a rare inflammation of the spinal cord. Obstacles like this one are not unexpected in vaccine development. That AstraZeneca is pausing trials to investigate signals that drug companies are taking safety seriously and staying out of pandemic politics. (Politico)
  • California is working to increase voting by mail in a bid to offset COVID-19 health risks of in-person voting. The 2016 California Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to mail every registered voter a ballot one month before an election. Of 15 counties polling in the 2018 and 2020 primaries, overall voter turnout was higher while groups such as foreign-language speakers and young voters saw declines. Outreach by trusted messengers may help in targeting low-turnout groups. (Public Policy Institute of California)
  • With the Senate poised to vote Thursday on a slender GOP coronavirus relief bill, chances for a bipartisan deal on new economic stimulus look remote. Congressional impasse has prompted the White House to consider a new round of executive actions bolstering unemployment benefits, more funding for school vouchers and supporting the airline industry. (The Washington Post)
  • Los Angeles city and county are partnering with Citizen and its contact tracing mobile app SafePass. SafePass will allow users to self-report their symptoms and test results for COVID-19 and receive notifications about possible exposure. All contact tracing data is anonymous, private, encrypted, and deleted after 30 days by Citizen.
  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)
  • New York Gov. Cuomo Tuesday announced the launch of the COVID-19 Report Card, an online dashboard which tracks real-time COVID-19 infections and testing operations of every K-12 New York State school and school district. Schools, local health departments, labs and all testing sites are directed to properly collect and report COVID-19 testing data for students and staff at each school in New York.

Latest research news

  • Researchers have discovered nearly two dozen previously unknown proteins encoded by SARS-CoV-2, and their role during infection is mostly mysterious. (Yaara Finkel et al. Nature)
  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)
  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg)
  • CARES Act expenditures reduced economic welfare losses by about 20 percent, while leaving the cumulative death count effectively unchanged. However, the stimulus package made the economic consequences of the pandemic more unequal. This is because the stimulus package redistributed heavily toward low-income households, while middle-income households gained little from the stimulus package but will face a higher future tax burden. (Greg Kaplan et al. Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, University of Chicago)

 

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 11th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 28,212,036. Total deaths: 910,314. Total recoveries: 19,037,471.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,399,978. Total deaths: 191,811. Total recoveries: 2,403,511.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 742,865. Total deaths: 13,978.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 251024 6128 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 50210 796 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 50471 1069 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11373 129 10.4 846,006
Riverside 54868
1094
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 251024 cases across LA County, including 6128 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 38 new deaths and 1165 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 11035

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 360 36,478
La Verne 431 32,206
Pomona 5176 152,361
Montclair 1146 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2615 177,751
Upland 1307 77,000

Policy

  • California is working to increase voting by mail in a bid to offset COVID-19 health risks of in-person voting. The 2016 California Voter’s Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to mail every registered voter a ballot one month before an election. Of 15 counties polling in the 2018 and 2020 primaries, overall voter turnout was higher while groups such as foreign-language speakers and young voters saw declines. Outreach by trusted messengers may help in targeting low-turnout groups. (Public Policy Institute of California)
  • With the Senate poised to vote Thursday on a slender GOP coronavirus relief bill, chances for a bipartisan deal on new economic stimulus look remote. Congressional impasse has prompted the White House to consider a new round of executive actions bolstering unemployment benefits, more funding for school vouchers and supporting the airline industry. (The Washington Post)
  • Los Angeles city and county are partnering with Citizen and its contact tracing mobile app SafePass. SafePass will allow users to self-report their symptoms and test results for COVID-19 and receive notifications about possible exposure. All contact tracing data is anonymous, private, encrypted, and deleted after 30 days by Citizen.
  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)
  • New York Gov. Cuomo Tuesday announced the launch of the COVID-19 Report Card, an online dashboard which tracks real-time COVID-19 infections and testing operations of every K-12 New York State school and school district. Schools, local health departments, labs and all testing sites are directed to properly collect and report COVID-19 testing data for students and staff at each school in New York.
  • Business and religious groups have been challenging states’ authority to impose restrictions on gatherings and other responses to the pandemic, claiming such orders can be discriminatory and violate economic property rights. Considering that the COVID-19 pandemic is not over, courts must safeguard against politicization of valid public health orders, while ensuring public safety. (Center for American Progress)

Latest research news

  • A case-control investigation of symptomatic outpatients from 11 U.S. health care facilities found that dining out was associated with COVID-19 positivity due to lack of mask use. Adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than were those with negative test results. (Kiva A. Fisher et al. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)
  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg)
  • CARES Act expenditures reduced economic welfare losses by about 20 percent, while leaving the cumulative death count effectively unchanged. However, the stimulus package made the economic consequences of the pandemic more unequal. This is because the stimulus package redistributed heavily toward low-income households, while middle-income households gained little from the stimulus package but will face a higher future tax burden. (Greg Kaplan et al. Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, University of Chicago)
  • Two open non-randomized studies of the effectiveness of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine show that two vaccine formulations – both carrying the gene for SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (rAd26-S and rAd5-S) were safe and well tolerated. All 76 participants reported mild adverse reactions to the shots, and no serious adverse events were detected. All participants produced antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein. (Denis Logunov et al. The Lancet)

 

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 10th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 27,925,613. Total deaths: 905,089. Total recoveries: 18,818,085.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,370,081. Total deaths: 191,168. Total recoveries: 2,387,479.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 739,527. Total deaths: 13,841.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 249859 6090 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 49909 791 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 50190 1065 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 11276 126 10.4 846,006
Riverside 54735
1085
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 249859 cases across LA County, including 6090 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 60 new deaths and 1038 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10981

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 358 36,478
La Verne 429 32,206
Pomona 5163 152,361
Montclair 1136 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2599 177,751
Upland 1297 77,000

Policy

  • With the Senate poised to vote Thursday on a slender GOP coronavirus relief bill, chances for a bipartisan deal on new economic stimulus look remote. Congressional impasse has prompted the White House to consider a new round of executive actions bolstering unemployment benefits, more funding for school vouchers and supporting the airline industry. (The Washington Post)
  • Los Angeles city and county are partnering with Citizen and its contact tracing mobile app SafePass. SafePass will allow users to self-report their symptoms and test results for COVID-19 and receive notifications about possible exposure. All contact tracing data is anonymous, private, encrypted, and deleted after 30 days by Citizen.
  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)
  • New York Gov. Cuomo Tuesday announced the launch of the COVID-19 Report Card, an online dashboard which tracks real-time COVID-19 infections and testing operations of every K-12 New York State school and school district. Schools, local health departments, labs and all testing sites are directed to properly collect and report COVID-19 testing data for students and staff at each school in New York.
  • Business and religious groups have been challenging states’ authority to impose restrictions on gatherings and other responses to the pandemic, claiming such orders can be discriminatory and violate economic property rights. Considering that the COVID-19 pandemic is not over, courts must safeguard against politization of valid public health orders, while ensuring public safety. (Center for American Progress)
  • CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield wrote to governors last week about the urgent need to have vaccine distribution sites up and running by November 1. To reach herd immunity against the coronavirus, the nation would likely need to vaccinate roughly 70 percent of Americans, which translates to 200 million people and 400 million shots. Despite committing more than $10 billion to develop new coronavirus vaccines, the U.S has not allocated money specifically for distributing and administering vaccines. (Kaiser Health News)

Latest research news

  • A study correcting for empirical bias due to incomplete testing and imperfect test accuracy shows substantial underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infection cases in the United States. The study estimates that the total number of coronavirus infections by April 18, 2020 was nine times larger than the 721,245 confirmed cases (2 per 1000) reported during this period. These results imply that 89 percent of infections in the U.S. were undocumented. (Sean L. Wu et al. Nature Communications)
  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg)
  • CARES Act expenditures reduced economic welfare losses by about 20 percent, while leaving the cumulative death count effectively unchanged. However, the stimulus package made the economic consequences of the pandemic more unequal. This is because the stimulus package redistributed heavily toward low-income households, while middle-income households gained little from the stimulus package but will face a higher future tax burden. (Greg Kaplan et al. Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, University of Chicago)
  • Two open non-randomized studies of the effectiveness of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine show that two vaccine formulations – both carrying the gene for SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (rAd26-S and rAd5-S) were safe and well tolerated. All 76 participants reported mild adverse reactions to the shots, and no serious adverse events were detected. All participants produced antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein. (Denis Logunov et al. The Lancet)
  • An experimental study of flow visualization found that face shields alone, as well as face masks with exhalation valves, might not be as effective as regular face masks and could have an adverse effect on mitigation efforts.(Florida Atlantic University)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 9th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 27,617,194. Total deaths: 898,456. Total recoveries: 18,586,672.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,330,316. Total deaths: 189,733. Total recoveries: 2,359,111.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 737,911. Total deaths: 13,758.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 248821 6030 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 49691 765 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 49845 1053 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10943 118 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53987
1067
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 248821 cases across LA County, including 6030 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 53 new deaths and 2414 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10950

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 355 36,478
La Verne 428 32,206
Pomona 5154 152,361
Montclair 1136 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2586 177,751
Upland 1292 77,000

Policy

  • Nine drug companies, including AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer, pledged Tuesday not to submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to have a vaccine before the November presidential election. (NPR)
  • New York Gov. Cuomo Tuesday announced the launch of the COVID-19 Report Card, an online dashboard which tracks real-time COVID-19 infections and testing operations of every K-12 New York State school and school district. Schools, local health departments, labs and all testing sites are directed to properly collect and report COVID-19 testing data for students and staff at each school in New York.
  • Business and religious groups have been challenging states’ authority to impose restrictions on gatherings and other responses to the pandemic, claiming such orders can be discriminatory and violate economic property rights. Considering that the COVID-19 pandemic is not over, courts must safeguard against politization of valid public health orders, while ensuring public safety. (Center for American Progress)
  • CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield wrote to governors last week about the urgent need to have vaccine distribution sites up and running by November 1. To reach herd immunity against the coronavirus, the nation would likely need to vaccinate roughly 70 percent of Americans, which translates to 200 million people and 400 million shots. Despite committing more than $10 billion to develop new coronavirus vaccines, the U.S has not allocated money specifically for distributing and administering vaccines. (Kaiser Health News)
  • Major hospitals across the U.S. are grappling with whether to ignore a federal decision allowing broader emergency use of blood plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients to treat the disease in favor of dedicating their resources to a clinical trial of COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna. The latter could help settle the science for good. At the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, for example, officials have opted to join the trial and are considering making it the first option for COVID patients who qualify. (Kaiser Health News)
  • San Francisco is the first U.S. city to use a central transit hub for rapid free testing of essential workers and other vulnerable groups as part of the city’s effort to assess the impact of coronavirus in Latinx communities. The initiative is led by UC San Francisco and multiple public and private partnerships. The data from the study show 11 percent positivity rate among Latinx participants, as compared to San Francisco’s overall positivity test at 2.6 percent. The majority of those who tested positive are Latinx (93 percent), speak Spanish as their preferred language (85 percent), earn incomes of less than $50,000 a year (87 percent), and live in high-density households (79 percent). (UC San Francisco)

Latest research news

  • A large, Phase 3 study testing a COVID-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford at dozens of sites across the U.S. has been put on hold due to a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant in the United Kingdom. The company’s statement cited standard review process, which triggered a pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data. (STAT)
  • International scientists question results from a study of Russia’s fast-moving coronavirus vaccine that were published in the Lancet, arguing that some of the findings appeared improbable. For instance, the researchers flagged concerns over seemingly identical levels of antibodies in a number of study participants who were inoculated with the experimental vaccine. (Bloomberg)
  • CARES Act expenditures reduced economic welfare losses by about 20 percent, while leaving the cumulative death count effectively unchanged. However, the stimulus package made the economic consequences of the pandemic more unequal. This is because the stimulus package redistributed heavily toward low-income households, while middle-income households gained little from the stimulus package but will face a higher future tax burden. (Greg Kaplan et al. Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, University of Chicago)
  • Two open non-randomized studies of the effectiveness of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine show that two vaccine formulations – both carrying the gene for SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (rAd26-S and rAd5-S) were safe and well tolerated. All 76 participants reported mild adverse reactions to the shots, and no serious adverse events were detected. All participants produced antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein. (Denis Logunov et al. The Lancet)
  • An experimental study of flow visualization found that face shields alone, as well as face masks with exhalation valves, might not be as effective as regular face masks and could have an adverse effect on mitigation efforts.(Florida Atlantic University)
  • Data from seven separate international trials of low dose hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and methylprednisolone found that steroids reduce the risk of death of critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 percent. The drugs were beneficial in the sickest patients regardless of age or sex or how long patients had been ill. (Reuters)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 8th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 27,382,880. Total deaths: 893,658. Total recoveries: 18,376,839.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,306,412. Total deaths: 189,283. Total recoveries: 2,333,551.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 735,235. Total deaths: 13,726.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 248821 6030 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 49691 765 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 49845 1053 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10943 118 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53987
1067
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 248821 cases across LA County, including 6030 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 53 new deaths and 2414 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10936

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 353 36,478
La Verne 426 32,206
Pomona 5143 152,361
Montclair 1136 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2586 177,751
Upland 1292 77,000

Policy

  • Business and religious groups have been challenging states’ authority to impose restrictions on gatherings and other responses to the pandemic, claiming such orders can be discriminatory and violate economic property rights. Considering that the COVID-19 pandemic is not over, courts must safeguard against politization of valid public health orders, while ensuring public safety. (Center for American Progress)
  • CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield wrote to governors last week about the urgent need to have vaccine distribution sites up and running by November 1. To reach herd immunity against the coronavirus, the nation would likely need to vaccinate roughly 70 percent of Americans, which translates to 200 million people and 400 million shots. Despite committing more than $10 billion to develop new coronavirus vaccines, the U.S has not allocated money specifically for distributing and administering vaccines. (Kaiser Health News)
  • Major hospitals across the U.S. are grappling with whether to ignore a federal decision allowing broader emergency use of blood plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients to treat the disease in favor of dedicating their resources to a clinical trial of COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna. The latter could help settle the science for good. At the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, for example, officials have opted to join the trial and are considering making it the first option for COVID patients who qualify. (Kaiser Health News)
  • San Francisco is the first U.S. city to use a central transit hub for rapid free testing of essential workers and other vulnerable groups as part of the city’s effort to assess the impact of coronavirus in Latinx communities. The initiative is led by UC San Francisco and multiple public and private partnerships. The data from the study show 11 percent positivity rate among Latinx participants, as compared to San Francisco’s overall positivity test at 2.6 percent. The majority of those who tested positive are Latinx (93 percent), speak Spanish as their preferred language (85 percent), earn incomes of less than $50,000 a year (87 percent), and live in high-density households (79 percent). (UC San Francisco)
  • California will soon be launching a new coronavirus data reporting system, after glitches in the current system resulted in inaccurate case totals. The new system will run parallel to the California Reportable Disease Information Exchange, or CalREDIE, which feeds positive results from labs to both the state and local public health departments. The state and counties use this information to calculate positivity rates, investigate cases and initiate contact tracing. (CalMatters)
  • Gov. Newsom last Friday unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide, stringent and slow plan for living with COVID-19 for the long haul. The plan imposes risk-based criteria on tightening and loosening allowable activities and expands the length of time between changes to assess how any movement affects the trajectory of the disease.

Latest research news

  • CARES Act expenditures reduced economic welfare losses by about 20 percent, while leaving the cumulative death count effectively unchanged. However, the stimulus package made the economic consequences of the pandemic more unequal. This is because the stimulus package redistributed heavily toward low-income households, while middle-income households gained little from the stimulus package but will face a higher future tax burden. (Greg Kaplan et al. Becker Friedman Institute for Economics, University of Chicago)
  • Two open non-randomized studies of the effectiveness of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine show that two vaccine formulations – both carrying the gene for SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (rAd26-S and rAd5-S) were safe and well tolerated. All 76 participants reported mild adverse reactions to the shots, and no serious adverse events were detected. All participants produced antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein. (Denis Logunov et al. The Lancet)
  • An experimental study of flow visualization found that face shields alone, as well as face masks with exhalation valves, might not be as effective as regular face masks and could have an adverse effect on mitigation efforts.(Florida Atlantic University)
  • Data from seven separate international trials of low dose hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and methylprednisolone found that steroids reduce the risk of death of critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 percent. The drugs were beneficial in the sickest patients regardless of age or sex or how long patients had been ill. (Reuters)
  • A study in Iceland found that antiviral antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 increased during two months after diagnosis and remained on a plateau up to four (D.F. Gudbjartsson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Salivary detection of SARS-CoV-2 has been proposed as an alternative to standard diagnostic methods of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. It might be of particular benefit for testing remote, vulnerable, or challenging populations, despite a lower estimated rate of viral detection relative to swab testing. (Lisa Caulley et al. Annals of Internal Medicine)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 7th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 27,164,557. Total deaths: 889,627. Total recoveries: 18,158,202.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,282,823. Total deaths: 188,979. Total recoveries: 2,315,995.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 732,144. Total deaths: 13,709.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 246407 5977 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 48615 744 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 49258 1042 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10943 118 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53987
1067
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 246407 cases across LA County, including 5977 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 45 new deaths and 1408 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10764

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 349 36,478
La Verne 422 32,206
Pomona 5087 152,361
Montclair 1108 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2538 177,751
Upland 1261 77,000

Policy

  • CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield wrote to governors last week about the urgent need to have vaccine distribution sites up and running by November 1. To reach herd immunity against the coronavirus, the nation would likely need to vaccinate roughly 70 percent of Americans, which translates to 200 million people and 400 million shots. Despite committing more than $10 billion to develop new coronavirus vaccines, the U.S has not allocated money specifically for distributing and administering vaccines. (Kaiser Health News)
  • Major hospitals across the U.S. are grappling with whether to ignore a federal decision allowing broader emergency use of blood plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients to treat the disease in favor of dedicating their resources to a clinical trial of COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna. The latter could help settle the science for good. At the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, for example, officials have opted to join the trial and are considering making it the first option for COVID patients who qualify. (Kaiser Health News)
  • San Francisco is the first U.S. city to use a central transit hub for rapid free testing of essential workers and other vulnerable groups as part of the city’s effort to assess the impact of coronavirus in Latinx communities. The initiative is led by UC San Francisco and multiple public and private partnerships. The data from the study show 11 percent positivity rate among Latinx participants, as compared to San Francisco’s overall positivity test at 2.6 percent. The majority of those who tested positive are Latinx (93 percent), speak Spanish as their preferred language (85 percent), earn incomes of less than $50,000 a year (87 percent), and live in high-density households (79 percent). (UC San Francisco)
  • California will soon be launching a new coronavirus data reporting system, after glitches in the current system resulted in inaccurate case totals. The new system will run parallel to the California Reportable Disease Information Exchange, or CalREDIE, which feeds positive results from labs to both the state and local public health departments. The state and counties use this information to calculate positivity rates, investigate cases and initiate contact tracing. (CalMatters)
  • Newsom last Friday unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide, stringent and slow plan for living with COVID-19 for the long haul. The plan imposes risk-based criteria on tightening and loosening allowable activities and expands the length of time between changes to assess how any movement affects the trajectory of the disease.
  • The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration promised over the weekend that review of a potential COVID-19 vaccine will be transparent to the public, and any clearance would be driven by data alone. Large, final-stage trials of experimental vaccines by leading pharmaceutical makers, including Pfizer and Moderna, remain in the future, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said, and there is insufficient data for judgment. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, speaking Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” said any early clearance of a vaccine will likely be for a small group at higher risk – and broad access to a vaccine realistically was “really a 2021 event.” (Bloomberg)

Latest research news

  • Two open non-randomized studies of the effectiveness of the Russian COVID-19 vaccine show that two vaccine formulations – both carrying the gene for SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (rAd26-S and rAd5-S) were safe and well tolerated. All 76 participants reported mild adverse reactions to the shots, and no serious adverse events were detected. All participants produced antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein. (Denis Logunov et al. The Lancet)
  • An experimental study of flow visualization found that face shields alone, as well as face masks with exhalation valves, might not be as effective as regular face masks and could have an adverse effect on mitigation efforts.(Florida Atlantic University)
  • Data from seven separate international trials of low dose hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and methylprednisolone found that steroids reduce the risk of death of critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 percent. The drugs were beneficial in the sickest patients regardless of age or sex or how long patients had been ill. (Reuters)
  • A study in Iceland found that antiviral antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 increased during two months after diagnosis and remained on a plateau up to four (D.F. Gudbjartsson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Salivary detection of SARS-CoV-2 has been proposed as an alternative to standard diagnostic methods of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. It might be of particular benefit for testing remote, vulnerable, or challenging populations, despite a lower estimated rate of viral detection relative to swab testing. (Lisa Caulley et al. Annals of Internal Medicine)
  • A British study has found that children and young people have less severe acute COVID-19 than adults. Critical care admission was associated with age younger than 1 month, age 10-14 years, and black ethnicity. The all cause in-hospital case fatality rate for children and young people was strikingly low at 1 percent (6 out of 627), compared with 27 percent in the whole cohort of all ages (0-106 years) over the same time period. (Olivia Swann et al. BMJ)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 4th

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 26,383,872. Total deaths: 870,126. Total recoveries: 17,562,036.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,166,939. Total deaths: 186,984. Total recoveries: 2,266,957.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 717,177. Total deaths: 13,327.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 244999 5932 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 48615 744 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 49142 1018 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10890 116 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53703
1053
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 244999 cases across LA County, including 5932 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 44 new deaths and 1064 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10733

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 347 36,478
La Verne 421 32,206
Pomona 5058 152,361
Montclair 1108 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2538 177,751
Upland 1261 77,000

Policy

  • Major hospitals across the U.S. are grappling with whether to ignore a federal decision allowing broader emergency use of blood plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients to treat the disease in favor of dedicating their resources to a clinical trial of COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna. The latter could help settle the science for good. At the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, for example, officials have opted to join the trial and are considering making it the first option for COVID patients who qualify. (Kaiser Health News)
  • San Francisco is the first U.S. city to use a central transit hub for rapid free testing of essential workers and other vulnerable groups as part of the city’s effort to assess the impact of coronavirus in Latinx communities. The initiative is led by UC San Francisco and multiple public and private partnerships. The data from the study show 11 percent positivity rate among Latinx participants, as compared to San Francisco’s overall positivity test at 2.6 percent. The majority of those who tested positive are Latinx (93 percent), speak Spanish as their preferred language (85 percent), earn incomes of less than $50,000 a year (87 percent), and live in high-density households (79 percent). (UC San Francisco)
  • California will soon be launching a new coronavirus data reporting system, after glitches in the current system resulted in inaccurate case totals. The new system will run parallel to the California Reportable Disease Information Exchange, or CalREDIE, which feeds positive results from labs to both the state and local public health departments. The state and counties use this information to calculate positivity rates, investigate cases and initiate contact tracing. (CalMatters)
  • Newsom last Friday unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide, stringent and slow plan for living with COVID-19 for the long haul. The plan imposes risk-based criteria on tightening and loosening allowable activities and expands the length of time between changes to assess how any movement affects the trajectory of the disease.
  • The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration promised over the weekend that review of a potential COVID-19 vaccine will be transparent to the public, and any clearance would be driven by data alone. Large, final-stage trials of experimental vaccines by leading pharmaceutical makers, including Pfizer and Moderna, remain in the future, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said, and there is insufficient data for judgment. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, speaking Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” said any early clearance of a vaccine will likely be for a small group at higher risk – and broad access to a vaccine realistically was “really a 2021 event.” (Bloomberg)
  • The American legal system is being called to referee disputes over school reopening in the age of coronavirus. Teachers unions asking courts to block reopenings to avoid exposing personnel to the virus. Dissatisfied with web-based schooling, parents in New York, Massachusetts and Oregon are suing to force state officials to reopen physical schools sooner. (The Hill)

Latest research news

  • An experimental study of flow visualization found that face shields alone, as well as face masks with exhalation valves, might not be as effective as regular face masks and could have an adverse effect on mitigation efforts.(Florida Atlantic University)
  • Data from seven separate international trials of low dose hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and methylprednisolone found that steroids reduce the risk of death of critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 percent. The drugs were beneficial in the sickest patients regardless of age or sex or how long patients had been ill. (Reuters)
  • A study in Iceland found that antiviral antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 increased during two months after diagnosis and remained on a plateau up to four (D.F. Gudbjartsson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Salivary detection of SARS-CoV-2 has been proposed as an alternative to standard diagnostic methods of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. It might be of particular benefit for testing remote, vulnerable, or challenging populations, despite a lower estimated rate of viral detection relative to swab testing. (Lisa Caulley et al. Annals of Internal Medicine)
  • A British study has found that children and young people have less severe acute COVID-19 than adults. Critical care admission was associated with age younger than 1 month, age 10-14 years, and black ethnicity. The all cause in-hospital case fatality rate for children and young people was strikingly low at 1 percent (6 out of 627), compared with 27 percent in the whole cohort of all ages (0-106 years) over the same time period. (Olivia Swann et al. BMJ)
  • With a population of five million people, New Zealand is now in the postelimination stage of the coronavirus outbreak. The country’s success bears lessons for other countries, including the need for rapid, science-based risk assessment by the government, followed by a series of interventions at the national, community and personal levels. (Michael G. Baker et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 3rd

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 26,074,609. Total deaths: 864,153. Total recoveries: 17,337,374.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,115,276. Total deaths: 185,958. Total recoveries: 2,231,757.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 712,052. Total deaths: 13,163.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 243935 5878 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 48245 743 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 49142 1007 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10806 116 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53306
1033
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 243935 cases across LA County, including 5878 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 49 new deaths and 1414 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10602

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 347 36,478
La Verne 421 32,206
Pomona 5030 152,361
Montclair 1099 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2455 177,751
Upland 1250 77,000

Policy

  • San Francisco is the first U.S. city to use a central transit hub for rapid free testing of essential workers and other vulnerable groups as part of the city’s effort to assess the impact of coronavirus in Latinx communities. The initiative is led by UC San Francisco and multiple public and private partnerships. The data from the study show 11 percent positivity rate among Latinx participants, as compared to San Francisco’s overall positivity test at 2.6 percent. The majority of those who tested positive are Latinx (93 percent), speak Spanish as their preferred language (85 percent), earn incomes of less than $50,000 a year (87 percent), and live in high-density households (79 percent). (UC San Francisco)
  • California will soon be launching a new coronavirus data reporting system, after glitches in the current system resulted in inaccurate case totals. The new system will run parallel to the California Reportable Disease Information Exchange, or CalREDIE, which feeds positive results from labs to both the state and local public health departments. The state and counties use this information to calculate positivity rates, investigate cases and initiate contact tracing. (CalMatters)
  • Newsom last Friday unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide, stringent and slow plan for living with COVID-19 for the long haul. The plan imposes risk-based criteria on tightening and loosening allowable activities and expands the length of time between changes to assess how any movement affects the trajectory of the disease.
  • The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration promised over the weekend that review of a potential COVID-19 vaccine will be transparent to the public, and any clearance would be driven by data alone. Large, final-stage trials of experimental vaccines by leading pharmaceutical makers, including Pfizer and Moderna, remain in the future, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said, and there is insufficient data for judgment. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, speaking Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” said any early clearance of a vaccine will likely be for a small group at higher risk – and broad access to a vaccine realistically was “really a 2021 event.” (Bloomberg)
  • The American legal system is being called to referee disputes over school reopening in the age of coronavirus. Teachers unions asking courts to block reopenings to avoid exposing personnel to the virus. Dissatisfied with web-based schooling, parents in New York, Massachusetts and Oregon are suing to force state officials to reopen physical schools sooner. (The Hill)
  • China and Russia have approved limited use of COVID-19 vaccines outside of clinical trials. In the United States, Operation Warp Speed is moving ahead with three out of eight US-backed vaccines in efficacy trials. FDA estimates of efficacy have error bars of sorts; for a COVID-19 vaccine, the FDA wants 95% confidence that efficacy is no lower than 30 percent. (Jon Cohen Science)

Latest research news

  • Data from seven separate international trials of low dose hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and methylprednisolone found that steroids reduce the risk of death of critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 percent. The drugs were beneficial in the sickest patients regardless of age or sex or how long patients had been ill. (Reuters)
  • A study in Iceland found that antiviral antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 increased during two months after diagnosis and remained on a plateau up to four (D.F. Gudbjartsson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Salivary detection of SARS-CoV-2 has been proposed as an alternative to standard diagnostic methods of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. It might be of particular benefit for testing remote, vulnerable, or challenging populations, despite a lower estimated rate of viral detection relative to swab testing. (Lisa Caulley et al. Annals of Internal Medicine)
  • A British study has found that children and young people have less severe acute COVID-19 than adults. Critical care admission was associated with age younger than 1 month, age 10-14 years, and black ethnicity. The all cause in-hospital case fatality rate for children and young people was strikingly low at 1 percent (6 out of 627), compared with 27 percent in the whole cohort of all ages (0-106 years) over the same time period. (Olivia Swann et al. BMJ)
  • With a population of five million people, New Zealand is now in the postelimination stage of the coronavirus outbreak. The country’s success bears lessons for other countries, including the need for rapid, science-based risk assessment by the government, followed by a series of interventions at the national, community and personal levels. (Michael G. Baker et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Variations in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 could explain why men are more likely to be hospitalized and die of COVID-19 than are women. A study found that in general, men have higher levels of certain inflammation-causing proteins known as cytokines and chemokines than women. By contrast, women tend to have a stronger response from immune cells known as T cells than men. (Takehiro Takahashi et al. Nature)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

Urban Institute Mapping Neighborhoods Where Low-income Renters Face Greater Risks of Housing Instability and Homelessness to Inform an Equitable COVID-19 Response

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 2nd

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 25,795,050. Total deaths: 858,072. Total recoveries: 17,117,728.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,078,513. Total deaths: 184,747. Total recoveries: 2,202,682.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 707,797. Total deaths: 13,018.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.

County-level statistics

Table 1. County-level confirmed cases, deaths, and case-fatality rates.

County Confirmed Cases Deaths Case-fatality rate per 1,000 Total Population
Los Angeles 242521 5829 23.8 10,039,107
San Bernardino 47879 736 14.5 2,180,085
Orange 48825 988 18.7 3,175,692
Ventura 10686 116 10.4 846,006
Riverside 53153
1026
18.9 2,470,546

Case-fatality rates may be biased due to undercounts in both cases and deaths


LA County

  • Total of 242521 cases across LA County, including 5829 deaths.
  • For the previous 24 hours, 45 new deaths and 753 new cases.

Cities in Claremont’s neighborhood

Total number of cases: 10532

Table 2. Confirmed cases in Claremont and neighboring cities

City Total Confirmed Cases Total Population
Claremont 347 36,478
La Verne 420 32,206
Pomona 5003 152,361
Montclair 1091 39,437
Rancho Cucamonga 2434 177,751
Upland 1237 77,000

Policy

  • California will soon be launching a new coronavirus data reporting system, after glitches in the current system resulted in inaccurate case totals. The new system will run parallel to the California Reportable Disease Information Exchange, or CalREDIE, which feeds positive results from labs to both the state and local public health departments. The state and counties use this information to calculate positivity rates, investigate cases and initiate contact tracing. (CalMatters)
  • Newsom last Friday unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a statewide, stringent and slow plan for living with COVID-19 for the long haul. The plan imposes risk-based criteria on tightening and loosening allowable activities and expands the length of time between changes to assess how any movement affects the trajectory of the disease.
  • The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration promised over the weekend that review of a potential COVID-19 vaccine will be transparent to the public, and any clearance would be driven by data alone. Large, final-stage trials of experimental vaccines by leading pharmaceutical makers, including Pfizer and Moderna, remain in the future, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said, and there is insufficient data for judgment. Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, speaking Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” said any early clearance of a vaccine will likely be for a small group at higher risk – and broad access to a vaccine realistically was “really a 2021 event.” (Bloomberg)
  • The American legal system is being called to referee disputes over school reopening in the age of coronavirus. Teachers unions asking courts to block reopenings to avoid exposing personnel to the virus. Dissatisfied with web-based schooling, parents in New York, Massachusetts and Oregon are suing to force state officials to reopen physical schools sooner. (The Hill)
  • China and Russia have approved limited use of COVID-19 vaccines outside of clinical trials. In the United States, Operation Warp Speed is moving ahead with three out of eight US-backed vaccines in efficacy trials. FDA estimates of efficacy have error bars of sorts; for a COVID-19 vaccine, the FDA wants 95% confidence that efficacy is no lower than 30 percent. (Jon Cohen Science)
  • Natural disasters pose a threat to federal financing of COVID-19-related emergency unemployment aid recently designated by presidential executive order. Provided without Congress’ approval and through FEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund, $300 weekly unemployment benefits are likely to come up short and be re-directed toward disaster recovery in Louisiana, Texas, Iowa and California. (CBS)

Latest research news

  • A study in Iceland found that antiviral antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 increased during two months after diagnosis and remained on a plateau up to four (D.F. Gudbjartsson et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Salivary detection of SARS-CoV-2 has been proposed as an alternative to standard diagnostic methods of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. It might be of particular benefit for testing remote, vulnerable, or challenging populations, despite a lower estimated rate of viral detection relative to swab testing. (Lisa Caulley et al. Annals of Internal Medicine)
  • A British study has found that children and young people have less severe acute COVID-19 than adults. Critical care admission was associated with age younger than 1 month, age 10-14 years, and black ethnicity. The all cause in-hospital case fatality rate for children and young people was strikingly low at 1 percent (6 out of 627), compared with 27 percent in the whole cohort of all ages (0-106 years) over the same time period. (Olivia Swann et al. BMJ)
  • With a population of five million people, New Zealand is now in the postelimination stage of the coronavirus outbreak. The country’s success bears lessons for other countries, including the need for rapid, science-based risk assessment by the government, followed by a series of interventions at the national, community and personal levels. (Michael G. Baker et al. The New England Journal of Medicine)
  • Variations in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 could explain why men are more likely to be hospitalized and die of COVID-19 than are women. A study found that in general, men have higher levels of certain inflammation-causing proteins known as cytokines and chemokines than women. By contrast, women tend to have a stronger response from immune cells known as T cells than men. (Takehiro Takahashi et al. Nature)
  • Better think twice about the old rule that six feet apart is the safe distance to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and other airborne diseases. The rule is based on old and not very rigorous observations of aerosols photographed during sneezing – and a better understanding needs to account for the size of droplets, the type of activity that produces droplets, indoor versus outdoor setting, ventilation and – yes – whether masks are worn. (Nicholas R. Jones et al. BMJ)

CGU Returning to Campus Training Video

The COVID Tracking Project

Protect Public Data Hub by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator by Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity, the George Washington University

California COVID-19 statistics by county

Los Alamos National Laboratory COVID-19 Forecasts 

Paul Bogaardt et al. IPRC Working Paper

CDC Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19: Data Updates by Select Demographic and Geographic Characteristics

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Census COVID-19 Impact Report

CDC COVID-19 Forecasts

Johns Hopkins University CSSE international map

RAND State Policy Evaluation Tool: The Health and Economic Impacts of COVID-19 Interventions

Map of California Counties advancing to Stage 2 of reopening

Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

COVID-19 Projections by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

COVID-19 Projections by the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium

Our World in Data COVID-19 Statistics and Research

Estimation of COVID-19 epidemic evaluation by the SIR model by Milan Batista (2020), fitVirusCOVID19

Imperial College London COVID-19 Behavior Tracker

Penn Wharton Budget Model

Kaiser Family Foundation Data Tool

RAND Tool for Estimating Critical Care Capacity

NBER Working papers on COVID-19 and Economics

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Papers on COVID-19

COVID-19 Research and Information from Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, University of Chicago

The Trump Administration’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again

September 1st

COVID-19 Updates

For live updates on COVID-19 at the state level, county level and the Claremont neighborhood, you can check our new COVID-19 Claremont Graduate University Dashboard.

  • Global: Total confirmed cases: 25,533,086. Total deaths: 851,647. Total recoveries: 16,865,101.
  • United States: Total confirmed cases: 6,036,569. Total deaths: 183,689. Total recoveries: 2,184,825.
  • California: Total confirmed cases: 704,085. Total deaths: 12,933.
    • California Governor  Newsom ordered statewide closure of indoor businesses, including bars, dine-in restaurants, movie theaters and museums, as well as fitness clubs, malls, places of worship and personal care services in more than 30 counties with increased COVID-19 cases. Impacted areas include Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside and Ventura counties. (CNBC)
    • Coronavirus continued its deadly increase, with Arkansas, California, Florida, Montana, Oregon and Texas reporting single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday. Texas passed the 400,000 mark for total confirmed cases since the outbreak began in late winter. California health officials say Latinos make up more than half its cases. (Reuters)
    • Los Angeles County on July 19 saw the highest number of new hospitalizations reported in a day, with 2,216 people hospitalized, surpassing the 2,193 hospitalizations seen on July 15. The majority of newly reported COVID-19 cases were among people under 41 years old.
    • COVID-19 deaths and cases in California are currently on the rise and trending to double every 24.8 days. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • California is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On June 23-24, the daily number of coronavirus cases increased by almost 12,700 new infections. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • San Bernardino County added another 115,353 coronavirus tests to its total count Saturday, August 29, that should have been included earlier. A data error by state officials had resulted in an ongoing undercount in the number of tests. (The Sun)
    • The reported numbers reflect the previous day’s data.
    • Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours on Sunday, setting a new record for the largest number of new reported cases in a state in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic. The previous record stood at 11,571 reported cases in New York on April 14, when the state was the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak. (CBS News)
    • California coronavirus deaths topped 7,000 over the weekend, marking the two deadliest days since the start of the pandemic.
    • No clear projections for reduction in social distancing protocols.
    • California is entering Stage 3 of reopening, allowing religious gatherings of up to 100 attendees, hotels, movie theaters, gyms, malls and personal care services in most counties. Most state parks and campgrounds remain closed. (The Los Angeles Times)
    • Gov. Newsom ordered Californians to wear face coverings in public places and at work, as well as outdoors when it is impossible to stay six feet apart from others. (CalMatters) See Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings here.
    • Los Angeles County has entered Phase 3 of reopening businesses and recreation facilities. (KTLA5) See what is open as of June 12 here.